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      Double Walker

      Released Nov 12, 2021 1h 11m Horror Mystery & Thriller TRAILER for Double Walker: Trailer 1 List Double Walker: Trailer 1 Double Walker: Trailer 1 1:26 View more videos
      80% Tomatometer 10 Reviews 39% Audience Score Fewer than 50 Ratings A young Ghost (producer/co-writer Sylvie Mix) haunts her cold Midwestern hometown, trying to piece together the horrific flashes of memories from her past. One by one she kills the men she believes were responsible for her death, though her plan is derailed when she meets Jack (Jacob Rice), a kind movie theater usher who inadvertently intercepts as she's stalking her next victim. While Jack takes her in and offers her a glimpse at a normal life, her desire to avenge her own murder lingers on. Read More Read Less Watch on Fandango at Home Premiered Apr 02 Buy Now

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      Critics Reviews

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      Sharai Bohannon Dread Central The only redeeming qualities are the runtime and the (buried) subject matter. Rated: 2/5 Dec 6, 2021 Full Review Dennis Schwartz Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews Intriguing low-budget opaque ghost story. Rated: B- Nov 18, 2021 Full Review Lee Jutton Film Inquiry Double Walker forces the audience to work a little harder than necessary to appreciate its strengths. Still, the film's many compelling images and performances make the struggle worthwhile. Nov 13, 2021 Full Review Sara Clements Daily Dead While Double Walker is a puzzle whose pieces don't always come together smoothly, it manages to do a lot in its short runtime. Rated: 3.5/5 Nov 13, 2021 Full Review Jennie Kermode Eye for Film Despite its fanciful premise, Double Walker is founded in a deep reality, addressing experiences which can be hard to deal with directly. Rated: 3.5/5 Nov 12, 2021 Full Review Josh Bell Crooked Marquee The circular story keeps returning to the same opaque musings and plot points, without illuminating anything about the girl's life or the people she left behind. Rated: C Nov 12, 2021 Full Review Read all reviews

      Audience Reviews

      View All (5) audience reviews
      brad p The only redeeming qualities are the runtime and the (buried) subject matter.. Rated 2 out of 5 stars 03/31/23 Full Review Audience Member Double Walker (rental) is an quirky ghost tale that leans pretty hard on the indie style over narrative substance. A murderous blood eating (maybe?) ghost tries to piece together her own story. The film stumbles through its mid section before finishing up with a ending that may confuse some viewers both because it is a bit unclear and because the film has lets say an unusual timeline. Fair warning this film covers some very dark territory. 3 stars out of 5, but that may be generous as you will likely need to like arthouse and horror to like it that much. Rated 3 out of 5 stars 01/24/23 Full Review Audience Member Directed by Colin West, who was also the cinematographer and co-writer along with producer and star Sylvie Mix, Double Walker presents a unique take on the ghost mythos in that it has A Wonderful Life edited throughout and gives us a world where when young girls die, their ghosts eventually age into young women that hunt and kill predatory men with a spoon and then drink their blood and also try to solve their own murders. The tagline says it all: She was given two choices: live one more day as a human, or live forever as a ghost. She chose the latter. There's a moment in this movie that totally took me aback, as the Ohio-shot snow footage began to play backward. It's a disquieting and strange moment in the midst of a film that's split between bloody revenge and longing for a return to life. And it's perfect. It knocked me out and made me love everything that followed. Rated 3 out of 5 stars 02/06/23 Full Review nathan z After watching so many nominal Ohio-made indies, it's a welcomed surprise to come across one that falls into the category of an "almost" movie, and by that I mean one with clear ambition and talent that almost fully works as a legit movie without any lingering qualifiers. Double Walker, filmed partially in Columbus and now given a national digital release, comes so tantalizingly close to being a full recommendation without hesitation. I can see what it's going for, and with a little more careful development and clarity I think it would have achieved all of its genre-busting goals. Sylvie Mix plays Ghost, a young woman who appears in a white nightgown in the woods. Who is she? What does she want? She is escorted by a young man into his home, disrobes, and then murders him. We come to learn that this adult woman is the ghost of a deceased child, and she's chosen to walk the Earth as a spirit to seek vengeance. She's only able to be seen by believers and sinners, though technically every person is a sinner unless there is an unspecified threshold to pass. The Ghost makes a friend, visits with her grieving parents, and reevaluates what it means to be human. The first thing to know about this movie is that it is only 65 minutes long, short of the 80 minutes typically seen as the minimum expectation for a theatrical release. It's not that far from meeting that goal, though the airy nature of the movie also makes it feel already stretched out. The other thing you should know about the movie is that you could describe it as Promising Young Woman meets The Crow, an avenging angel targeting the bad men responsible for her death, except tonally it's not really a hard-hitting revenge thriller. It has those elements where our Ghost is stalking her very bad men, luring them into positions of vulnerability, and striking back for justice, but the movie seems more aligned in tone with something more ponderous and poetic like 2016's A Ghost Story (though absent ten minutes of Rooney Mara eating a pie – thus fulfilling my obligation to mention this dumbfounding cinematic moment whenever I have the opportunity, you're welcome). For those people looking for sundry exploitation thrills, seized by the striking central image of its poster, you may be left checking your watch, but I found this middle ground between thriller and art film to be an interesting space for Double Walker to inhabit. The screenplay drops you into its bizarre scenario and unfolds slowly, which I think worked to the film's potent atmosphere. You don't really know what's going on or what the character relationships are like. At first you see a grieving family, and next we cut to a man discovering a pale woman who seems lost in the woods. She comes across ethereal and mysterious. Then there is a murder, and from there we're trying to identify the character connections and back-story, which comes across at a gentle yet assured pace that trusts the audience to put the different pieces together to form a whole. This works well except for an ending that comes across as too confusing, muddling an already convoluted system of supernatural rules that the movie seems to be undercutting, unless the whole thing is presented as a hopeful but passing dream, and if that's the ending then I'm going to be quite disappointed. Still, this is a movie at its core more interested with the question over being human, being remembered, and personal identity than as a blood-soaked revenge thriller. Again, it has its moments of blood, but there's a somber tone poem quality to the movie that elevates its ambitions and also ties down its ultimate execution. Director and co-screenwriter Colin West is using the structure of an exploitation film to do more than deliver sleazy thrills. He devotes much more time to watching our Ghost character adjust to life as a spirit. The Ghost is the same spirit as the little girl we saw being eulogized in the opening. This presents some awkwardness for the character and the viewer. For the character, she's gone from the mind of a child to being in the body of an adult, and it's not determined whether this adult body is what she would have eventually grown into being or whether it's just a default model. This allows for an even more curious performance as a character that feels alien in their own skin but also fascinated by that change in perspective, like Scarlet Johansson in Under the Skin. I understand the Ghost studying her adult body with curiosity. However, for the viewer, the numerous nude scenes can make you uncomfortable with the understanding that this is a little girl transported into the body of an adult and she is using her sexuality to lure men to their perverted doom. Maybe I'm just more sensitive to this connotation, and "using her sexuality" seems like an overstatement as she's simply a woman being present with predatory men. I will say the nude scenes are tastefully portrayed where the camera doesn't feel like it's going to painful lengths to feature flesh. I was about to accuse the movie of possibly being skeevy with its plurality of nude scenes (does the Ghost need to run out into the woods in the buff?) when I noticed that Mix is also the producer and co-screenwriter. I assume she approved of her depiction. Because of her newfound identity, and separation from most living beings, Double Walker presents a main character who is trying to form connections but cannot. The Ghost tries to console her grieving mother but is unable to be seen or felt by her. She does meet a kind man (Jacob Rice) at a movie theater who helps her out and who is not looking to take advantage of her. He shares his family's home movies, which is a slightly strange thing to do so soon with a nearly mute stranger, and compares the images captured on film like ghosts, crystalized memories of people no longer with us. I have thought of this comparison myself and will morbidly watch background extras in old movies and think, "Here they are, alive once more, but likely gone for some time." The direct connection of ghosts and memory allows the movie another layer to provide additional meaning. However, Double Walker feels more like a stretched out short film than a fleshed-out feature. With a few extra wrinkles and plot development, this could have readily afforded a larger story. Later on, the Ghost makes a rash decision and an innocent is harmed in her path to vengeance. I think that's an interesting direction and questions the righteousness of her cause, while at the same time the script finds a personal way to make that mistake even more grueling. Again, the script really could have gone into this consequence and pushed the character into more inner turmoil, to question the cost of her mission, and to question her perception of human life. There are areas where the movie could have gone into further deliberation, but they feel short-changed. Double Walker is settled being the extra long version of the movie it presents in its first act. This is a very professional looking and sounding movie and probably has the best photography of any Ohio-made indie I've watched yet. West also served as his director of photography, and his eye for visuals is crisp and pleasing. The use of light, shadow, foreground and background, composition, movement, it was very deliberate as well as being artistic in a way that didn't feel like it was overly self-indulgent. West achieves an artistry without making it flashy, and that's even harder to accomplish. The score and sound design are also polished as well. When the Ghost is luring a victim, the eerie sound is reminiscent of metallic scraping to elicit unease. The costuming keeps our Ghost in white outfits, noting her innocence but also visually connecting you to the associated color of traditional spirits (an also, maybe, A Ghost Story). It makes her standout on the screen. Speaking of that, Mix (Poser) is a natural actor. She has a presence to her and ably communicates the curiosity and otherworldly nature of her character's dilemma. She doesn't talk much, nobody really does in this movie, but there's a melancholy to her that feels more pained than forced. The other actors do well with their minor roles, including other Ohio actors I've covered before like Justin Rose (False Flag) and Ralph Scott (Constraint) playing bad men who become ghostly prey. By the end of Double Walker, I was left feeling almost satisfied, one of those film experiences where you can see the better movie just on the peripheral, the one that was so close. As it stands, it's an arty and contemplative movie that uses the exploitation formula as a vehicle to explore more existential questions. I wish the movie had developed the story more from the potential on display, and what potential is on display. The filmmakers here feel like they are headed for great things. West has already filmed another movie he wrote, Linoleum, starring Jim Gaffigan and Tony Shalhoub about a science teacher who always wanted to be an astronaut and builds his own rocket ship in his garage. That sounds amazing and it has big names to fill out the cast. I'm rooting for West. This guy has the talent and ability to be a rising indie director and can do Ohio proud. Double Walker could end up being the flawed but promising start to a burgeoning film career. It's worth watching but be warned that it might not be the movie you anticipate at first glance. Nate's Grade: B Rated 4 out of 5 stars 03/31/23 Full Review Audience Member Not worth watching, doesn't deserve the hype. Idk why I got a suggestion, ended up here giving a review. Rated 0.5 out of 5 stars 02/15/23 Full Review Read all reviews Post a rating

      Cast & Crew

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      Movie Info

      Synopsis A young Ghost (producer/co-writer Sylvie Mix) haunts her cold Midwestern hometown, trying to piece together the horrific flashes of memories from her past. One by one she kills the men she believes were responsible for her death, though her plan is derailed when she meets Jack (Jacob Rice), a kind movie theater usher who inadvertently intercepts as she's stalking her next victim. While Jack takes her in and offers her a glimpse at a normal life, her desire to avenge her own murder lingers on.
      Director
      Sylvie Mix, Colin West
      Screenwriter
      Colin West, Sylvie Mix
      Distributor
      Cranked Up Films
      Production Co
      Sub_Sequential Pictures
      Genre
      Horror, Mystery & Thriller
      Original Language
      English
      Release Date (Theaters)
      Nov 12, 2021, Limited
      Release Date (Streaming)
      Nov 12, 2021
      Runtime
      1h 11m
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