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      3:10 to Yuma

      Released Aug 7, 1957 1h 32m Western List
      94% Tomatometer 31 Reviews 79% Audience Score 5,000+ Ratings Dan Evans (Van Heflin), a drought-plagued Arizona rancher, volunteers to take captured stagecoach robber and murderer Ben Wade (Glenn Ford) from Bisbee to Contention City, where the criminal will be put aboard the 3:10 train to Yuma for his trial. Accompanied only by the town drunk, Alex Potter (Henry Jones), Dan battles Wade's henchman (Richard Jaeckel), the murder victim's revenge-minded brother, and the temptation of the large bribe Wade offers in exchange for his freedom. Read More Read Less Watch on Fandango at Home Buy Now

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      3:10 to Yuma

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      Critics Reviews

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      Michael Sragow New Yorker The compositions evoke a kind of open-air claustrophobia ... Jul 21, 2014 Full Review Stephen Garrett Time Out A portrait of storytelling made for and by the Silent Generation, an audience all too familiar with the world's spooky, white-knuckled moral twilight. Rated: 4/5 May 10, 2011 Full Review Steven D. Greydanus Decent Films Although not as nerve-wracking as High Noon, 3:10 to Yuma is even more claustrophobic… and the two-character drama is more intriguing than High Noon's protagonist standing alone. Rated: A- Sep 21, 2007 Full Review Yasser Medina Cinefilia A revisionist western that, in its eagerness to break with some of the established parameters of the genre, traverses uneven terrain dominated by lack of drive and cowboys who talk more than they shoot in broad daylight. [Full review in Spanish] Rated: 6/10 Apr 28, 2023 Full Review Sean Axmaker Stream on Demand ... a taut, austere western in the High Noon mode but with a film noir sensibility. Feb 4, 2023 Full Review Cole Smithey ColeSmithey.com Here's a Western you can lean into. A double whisky up with a cold water back will do. Rated: FIVE STARS Mar 14, 2022 Full Review Read all reviews

      Audience Reviews

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      Matthew B A well-received movie since its first release, 3:10 to Yuma has perhaps suffered a little from its over-familiarity to lovers of westerns. Often repeated on television, it is easy to become blasé about the charms of Delmer Daves' 1957 western. The story concerns a struggling rancher called Dan Evans (played by van Heflin). Whatever his background, t this stage of his life, the older Evans is the man who stands by and watches. He watches a stagecoach hold-up in which the coach driver is shot, and his inactivity disappoints his two sons when he refuses to intervene to help. His wife too expresses her dissatisfaction with his inaction. "It seems terrible that something bad can happen and all anybody can do is stand by and watch". The coach driver was shot by Ben Wade (Glenn Ford), the leader of the outlaws. The robbery has turned into something more serious by the time that Dan Evans arrives in the town of Bisbee to report the incident. Wade is captured soon after, and the next question is how to hand him into custody. The Marshal wishes to take Wade to the appropriately named Contention City and put him on the train to Yuma, but he is unable to go himself. Despite the promise of payment from the stage-line owner, Mr Butterfield (Robert Emhardt), only two men volunteer for the perilous journey – the town drunk Alex Potter (Henry Jones) and the cash-strapped Evans. The rest of the movie follows the three captors, Evans, Butterfield and Potter, as they seek to get Wade onto the 3:10 to Yuma. The movie bears many comparisons to the more famous western, High Noon. Like High Noon, 3:10 to Yuma involves a tense countdown until the arrival of a train. Whereas the danger in High Noon is posed by the arrival of the leader of a band of outlaws who has been released from prison, the peril in 3:10 to Yuma lies in facing a band of outlaws who are trying to stop the hero from putting their leader onto a train so that he can be taken to prison. Additionally, the movie is not made in real time, and the countdown only occupies the second half of the movie. High Noon depicts a town in which the marshal spends much of the movie engaged in a futile search for help against the gang of outlaws who are due to arrive in town. The entire town refuses to help the marshal for a variety of selfish and cowardly motives. In 3:10 to Yuma, a similar situation unfolds. Here it is not a representative of the law who is asked to enforce justice, but a hired rancher. Evans too will find that as the clock ticks closer to 3:10, the help that he has been promised will vanish. The director Delmer Daves goes to great lengths to bring home to us the desperation of Evans' plight as a farmer during a drought. Daves chose to make the western in black-and-white, and he employs red filters on the camera lens to make the landscape look more parched. The effect is also enhanced by the long shots of the landscape. We can see the dry dust being kicked up from under the heels of horses. When Wade's men finally ride into Contention City, they pass a line of cacti in the desert. 3:10 to Yuma may have become a familiar western to many, but we should not overlook its merits. It provides the viewer with a jaundiced look at the effectiveness of justice when people are unwilling to do what is necessary, but it also asserts the value of standing up for what is right, even if you stand alone and face great danger. I wrote a longer appreciation of 3:10 to Yuma on my blog page if you would like to read more: https://themoviescreenscene.wordpress.com/2017/09/15/310-to-yuma-1957/ Rated 4.5 out of 5 stars 09/22/23 Full Review Red T It exceeded all my expectations. This is an underrated All Time Classic. The main strengths of the is film are its phenomenal cinematography, excellent music, and surprisingly strong suspense. The black and white works amazingly and the camerawork is phenomenal. Most of the second half takes place in a hotel but it adds to the suspense buildup. This is basically a thriller and a western merged together which I have only seen really with High Noon. Not much shooting happens in this and it all just builds tension and delivers extremely well with a tense and fun ending. The acting is really good also the only complaints I would say is Van & Ford give really strong performances but I wish Van had more charisma like a Henry Fonda and I wish Ford was more menacing rather than suave but both have really good chemistry. The supporting cast is excellent also. This is something everyone should give a try once. Definitely was a surprise how good this was. Rated 5 out of 5 stars 07/17/23 Full Review Donald S The characters in this movie especially Ben Wade were so compelling and interesting. Rated 4.5 out of 5 stars 06/10/23 Full Review Jelisije J A beautifully shot Western that deserves a lot of love and appreciation, but shockingly I prefer the 2007 remake of this film. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 01/31/23 Full Review Liam D One of the more underrated movies in the western genre a tense, action packed movie filled with memorable characters and great acting Rated 5 out of 5 stars 11/06/22 Full Review Christopher B A psychological Western that, once established, lays down a thick layer of suspense and not until the last frame does it ease up. The film has some solid performances from it's leads Heflin and Ford and a good supporting cast to go with the original story. I still think the remake edges this out, but it's a solid western that plays by its own rules. Rated 4 out of 5 stars 11/07/22 Full Review Read all reviews
      3:10 to Yuma

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      Movie Info

      Synopsis Dan Evans (Van Heflin), a drought-plagued Arizona rancher, volunteers to take captured stagecoach robber and murderer Ben Wade (Glenn Ford) from Bisbee to Contention City, where the criminal will be put aboard the 3:10 train to Yuma for his trial. Accompanied only by the town drunk, Alex Potter (Henry Jones), Dan battles Wade's henchman (Richard Jaeckel), the murder victim's revenge-minded brother, and the temptation of the large bribe Wade offers in exchange for his freedom.
      Director
      Delmer Daves
      Producer
      David Heilweil
      Screenwriter
      Elmore Leonard, Halsted Welles
      Distributor
      Columbia Pictures
      Production Co
      Columbia Pictures Corporation
      Genre
      Western
      Original Language
      English
      Release Date (Theaters)
      Aug 7, 1957, Wide
      Release Date (Streaming)
      Apr 16, 2012
      Runtime
      1h 32m
      Sound Mix
      Mono
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