Rotten Tomatoes
Cancel Movies Tv shows Shop News Showtimes

Gentleman's Agreement

Released Nov 11, 1947 1h 58m Drama List
82% Tomatometer 83 Reviews 78% Audience Score 5,000+ Ratings
When journalist Phil Green (Gregory Peck) moves to New York City, he takes on a high-profile magazine assignment about anti-Semitism. In order to truly view things from an empathetic perspective, he pretends to be a Jew and begins to experience many forms of bigotry, both firsthand and through a Jewish friend, Dave Goldman (John Garfield). Phil soon falls in love with beautiful Kathy Lacy (Dorothy McGuire), but their relationship is complicated by his unusual endeavor. Read More Read Less
Watch on Fandango at Home Buy Now

Where to Watch

Gentleman's Agreement

Fandango at Home Prime Video Apple TV

Rent Gentleman's Agreement on Fandango at Home, Prime Video, Apple TV, or buy it on Fandango at Home, Prime Video, Apple TV.

Gentleman's Agreement

What to Know

Critics Consensus

It occasionally fails to live up to its subject matter -- and is perhaps an 'important' film more than a 'great' one -- but the performances from Gregory Peck and Dorothy McGuire are superb.

Read Critics Reviews

Critics Reviews

View All (83) Critics Reviews
Richard Lawson Vanity Fair Caplan’s performance is the vital anchor of the series. Without her, and without Brodesser-Akner’s graceful writing for her to manipulate so dexterously, Fleishman Is in Trouble would feel a lot less substantial. Nov 16, 2022 Full Review Helen Bower Detroit Free Press Tangy and crisp as tossed salad straight from the refrigerator, [Celeste Holm]'s the smart package of chlorophyll that rids the air of unpleasant tension and makes it one-world fresh. Nov 16, 2022 Full Review Mildred Martin Philadelphia Inquirer The film has an urgency, a sincerity and a persuasiveness which, for this reader, the book lacked. Credit for this, it seems to us, goes primarily to Moss Hart and Elia Kazan. Nov 16, 2022 Full Review Mark Johnson Awards Daily The façade adds to a narrative that is both complex and intelligent, and it is a well-meaning film with a big heart even if it comes off a bit puffed up and self-congratulatory today. Jun 27, 2023 Full Review Harold V. Cohen Pittsburgh Post-Gazette The shoulder Gentleman's Agreement talks directly from has no chip on it, but it wears an epaulet of courage and straightens up in an eloquent plea for the common decency all mankind is heir to. Nov 16, 2022 Full Review Herbert Cohn Brooklyn Daily Eagle It states its case with such frankness, such screen grace and such persuasiveness that it will do more for man's understanding of man than the most militant haranguer. And not for an instant does it fail to be a captivating screen show. Nov 16, 2022 Full Review Read all reviews

Audience Reviews

View All (312) audience reviews
adam s Thought provoking and relevant Rated 5 out of 5 stars 03/30/23 Full Review joe m It was a groundbreaking movie and courageous in how it exposes widespread unspoken prejudice. I can only wonder what people of color thought about this as segregation and Jim Crow laws were everyday life in America but never mentioned in this movie. I think that failure makes this movie seem somewhat hypocritical. Rated 4 out of 5 stars 03/31/23 Full Review Audience Member Pretty rousing in what could be deemed a slightly sanctimonious manner but that would be to overlook just how rampant explicit displays of racism would have been in 1940s America. Arguably the most interesting aspect is that the film focuses on anti-semi Tien as opposed to the even more oppressive racist restrictions in black lives at the time. Too early maybe. Anyway, not much else to say about the film as the strength lay less in the plot than the strength of the convictions. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 01/28/23 Full Review Audience Member This film is way ahead of its time and is applicable to prejudice of all forms. It also addresses the the often not discussed guilt by silence. Rated 5 out of 5 stars 02/06/23 Full Review david c Pacing of the film has good and the acting even better. John Garfield was my favorite as Peck Jewish childhood buddy. And a very young Dean Stockwell was also impressive. Surprised at how relevant the message of not staying silent when others make fun of a minority. Wished I seen this film years ago. I would have been a better person because of it. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 03/31/23 Full Review william d It would be easy for a film about anti-Semitism to bash you over the head with caricatures of brutal bigots. Gentleman's Agreement isn't like that at all. The script is intelligent and nuanced and the cast is superb. The dialog gets a little preachy towards the end though, causing me to deduct a star. Rated 4 out of 5 stars 03/31/23 Full Review Read all reviews
Gentleman's Agreement

My Rating

Read More Read Less POST RATING WRITE A REVIEW EDIT REVIEW

Cast & Crew

The Razor's Edge 56% 71% The Razor's Edge Boomerang! 76% 64% Boomerang! A Tree Grows in Brooklyn 94% 90% A Tree Grows in Brooklyn No Way Out 86% 82% No Way Out The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit 71% 73% The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit Discover more movies and TV shows. View More

Movie Info

Synopsis When journalist Phil Green (Gregory Peck) moves to New York City, he takes on a high-profile magazine assignment about anti-Semitism. In order to truly view things from an empathetic perspective, he pretends to be a Jew and begins to experience many forms of bigotry, both firsthand and through a Jewish friend, Dave Goldman (John Garfield). Phil soon falls in love with beautiful Kathy Lacy (Dorothy McGuire), but their relationship is complicated by his unusual endeavor.
Director
Elia Kazan
Producer
Darryl F Zanuck
Screenwriter
Laura Z. Hobson, Moss Hart
Distributor
20th Century Fox
Production Co
Twentieth Century Fox
Genre
Drama
Original Language
English
Release Date (Theaters)
Nov 11, 1947, Wide
Release Date (Streaming)
Mar 1, 2013
Runtime
1h 58m
Sound Mix
Mono
Aspect Ratio
Flat (1.37:1)
Most Popular at Home Now