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      Hollywood Chinese

      2007 1h 30m Documentary List
      100% Tomatometer 17 Reviews Filmmaker Arthur Dong's documentary Hollywood Chinese pays homage to the first century of the American film industry, as specifically colored and influenced by the Chinese immigrants to whom Hollywood owes an inestimable debt. Dong touches on everyone from actress Anna May Wong, of Limehouse Blues (1934) and Lady from Chungking (1943), to the late cameraman James Wong Howe, responsible for giving the Rock Hudson thriller Seconds (1966) such a creepy and inventive look. Dong also explores the newer generation of Chinese-American filmmakers, including such giants as Wayne Wang and Ang Lee, responsible for such contemporary classics as The Joy Luck Club, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, and Brokeback Mountain. At the same time, a haunting and telling undercurrent of racism and stereotypes weaves its way in, suggestive of the difficulties that Chinese men and women found working in Hollywood -- particularly in the early years. As a historical footnote, Dong also makes film history by rediscovering and editing in footage from what is alleged to be the first Asian-American film ever made: the 1916 Curse of Quon Gwan, directed by Marion Wong. Read More Read Less

      Critics Reviews

      View All (17) Critics Reviews
      Reece Pendleton Chicago Reader There's more celebration than insight as the story moves closer to the present, but it's still a worthy look at a seriously neglected part of Hollywood. Jun 9, 2020 Full Review Dennis Harvey Variety A century of Chinese and Chinese-American screen representation is gracefully charted in Hollywood Chinese. Jun 9, 2020 Full Review Michael Musto Village Voice Dong has assembled a top bunch of talking heads like Ang Lee, Nancy Kwan, and Amy Tan, who speak more with wry bemusement than with anger about Hollywood's cultural limitations. Jun 9, 2020 Full Review David Lamble Bay Area Reporter Dong's subjects explain that each era has brought with it new freedoms and accompanying pitfalls. Jun 9, 2020 Full Review Michael Fox SF Weekly [An] endlessly entertaining survey of Hollywood's depiction of Chinese and Chinese-American characters. Jun 9, 2020 Full Review Bob Strauss Los Angeles Daily News The film is primarily a more astute-than-average combination of vintage footage and talking heads. Rated: 3/4 May 30, 2008 Full Review Read all reviews
      Hollywood Chinese

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      Movie Info

      Synopsis Filmmaker Arthur Dong's documentary Hollywood Chinese pays homage to the first century of the American film industry, as specifically colored and influenced by the Chinese immigrants to whom Hollywood owes an inestimable debt. Dong touches on everyone from actress Anna May Wong, of Limehouse Blues (1934) and Lady from Chungking (1943), to the late cameraman James Wong Howe, responsible for giving the Rock Hudson thriller Seconds (1966) such a creepy and inventive look. Dong also explores the newer generation of Chinese-American filmmakers, including such giants as Wayne Wang and Ang Lee, responsible for such contemporary classics as The Joy Luck Club, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, and Brokeback Mountain. At the same time, a haunting and telling undercurrent of racism and stereotypes weaves its way in, suggestive of the difficulties that Chinese men and women found working in Hollywood -- particularly in the early years. As a historical footnote, Dong also makes film history by rediscovering and editing in footage from what is alleged to be the first Asian-American film ever made: the 1916 Curse of Quon Gwan, directed by Marion Wong.
      Director
      Arthur Dong
      Producer
      Arthur Dong
      Screenwriter
      Arthur Dong
      Genre
      Documentary
      Original Language
      English
      Runtime
      1h 30m