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      House of Usher

      R Released May 9, 2008 1h 23m Mystery & Thriller Horror List
      Reviews 9% Audience Score 250+ Ratings Victor Reynolds (Michael Cardelle) is visiting his friends, brother and sister Roderick (Frank Mentier) and Madeline Usher (Jaimyse Haft), on their family estate, but there's something that doesn't feel right -- and its not just their creepy servant, Markus (Jack Carlisle). The house is crumbling both inside and out, and Victor discovers that everyone who has ever visited there has disappeared, never to return again. As he investigates, he soon realizes his life is in danger. Read More Read Less

      Audience Reviews

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      Audience Member Soft-corn gay porn trash thriller - without much porn, and utterly without thrills, Cute cast often stripped of shirts, but that's as far as it goes. Lots of faux-passionate kissing, and a plot that makes the sex scenes look like High Literature. Truly a waste of 90 minutes. Rated 0.5 out of 5 stars 02/19/23 Full Review Audience Member As disgusting as the cover. An absolute insult to Poe. Rated 0.5 out of 5 stars 01/27/23 Full Review Audience Member @Jenn Warren hated it too! Rated 1 out of 5 stars 01/17/23 Full Review Audience Member Pretty shitty. It was basically softcore gay porn with a Poe theme. Kinda liked it as a background movie though but Madeline Usher was not well cast at all. Rated 1.5 out of 5 stars 02/19/23 Full Review Audience Member Edgar Allen Poe is without a doubt one of the greatest writers ever to have graced the profession, and The Fall of the House of Usher is one of his best pieces of work ever produced. David DeCoteau isn't one of the greatest directors of all time, though he has directed some decent films like Puppet Master III. Some of his earlier films have displayed a level of homoeroticism to them, but steadily over the past ten years or so his work hasn't been as subtle. I don't like using the word gay in a negative context, and I hope that the way I'm about to use it isn't seen that way. When it comes to David DeCoteao's House of Usher, well, it doesn't get any gayer than this. Structurally House of Usher somewhat follows the story that it is based on. Both Roderick (Frank Mentier) and Madeline Usher (Jaimyse Haft) are present, and they are being visited by an old childhood friend, who the film gives the name Victor Reynolds (Michael Cardelle). And the house that the Usher kids live in is filled with mysterious occurrences and strange goings-on. But DeCoteau isn't interested in creating a faithful adaptation of the story; he's interested in buff men wearing as very little clothing as possible. I actually would have liked to have been in the meeting when this gay version of House of Usher was pitched. I wonder how long it took to convince the studio about taking on this project, and if any of Poe's other bodies of work were considered to be transformed into gay-erotic cinema. I can imagine The Raven being worked into something like this, and it featuring a perverted old man being pestered by a young twink who has perched himself on the door instead of an actual raven doing so. Acting wise, House of Usher isn't going to impress you much. Looking over the lead cast member's resumes I discovered that these actors have very little film acting experience, while some have primarily soap-opera acting experience. I didn't like Frank Mentier much as Roderick, who seems to want to be an extra in a Matrix film most of the time. Michael Cardelle wasn't too bad, but the film appears to be more concerned with giving him reasons to lose his clothes than giving him lines of dialogue. I know you can't take a film like this too seriously, but the newly added twist ending of this film adaptation of House of Usher upset me a bit. I don't know if it's because it insults the source material slightly, or the fact that it felt like a wasted effort for a film that was really only about having hot-bodied men in close vicinity of each other as many times as possible. I guess if you are hankering to see attractive young male skin, this movie might be up your alley. But if you are seeking a good Edgar Allen Poe adaptation, you're better off sticking with the Vincent Price version of this story. Rated 1 out of 5 stars 01/25/23 Full Review Audience Member * (out of four) A retelling of the classic tale, "The Fall of the House of Usher" by Edgar Allen Poe as only David DeCoteau can do. It features his trademark eroticism and bevy of twisted women and handsome guys, but none of that adds up to a decent, or even watchable thriller. Victor returns to the house of his former lover, but he notices that Rodrick Usher and his sister have changed since he last saw them. Rated 0.5 out of 5 stars 02/09/23 Full Review Read all reviews Post a rating

      Cast & Crew

      Movie Info

      Synopsis Victor Reynolds (Michael Cardelle) is visiting his friends, brother and sister Roderick (Frank Mentier) and Madeline Usher (Jaimyse Haft), on their family estate, but there's something that doesn't feel right -- and its not just their creepy servant, Markus (Jack Carlisle). The house is crumbling both inside and out, and Victor discovers that everyone who has ever visited there has disappeared, never to return again. As he investigates, he soon realizes his life is in danger.
      Director
      David DeCoteau
      Producer
      Paul Colichman, David DeCoteau, Stephen P. Jarchow, John Schouweiler
      Screenwriter
      Simon Savory
      Distributor
      Regent Releasing
      Production Co
      Rapid Heart Pictures
      Rating
      R (Sexual Content)
      Genre
      Mystery & Thriller, Horror
      Original Language
      English
      Release Date (Theaters)
      May 9, 2008, Limited
      Release Date (Streaming)
      Aug 23, 2020
      Box Office (Gross USA)
      $1.5K
      Runtime
      1h 23m