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      Mission to Moscow

      Released May 22, 1943 2h 3m History Drama List
      Reviews 20% Audience Score 100+ Ratings Joseph E. Davies (Walter Huston) is the American ambassador to the Soviet Union between World War I and World War II. Moving to the communist state, Davies records his impressions of Soviet life, politics and foreign policy. He and his family adjust to their new home, while maintaining their American values. Made at the behest of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the film served to familiarize the American public with the Soviet Union, who were key allies at the time of production. Read More Read Less

      Critics Reviews

      View All (2) Critics Reviews
      Lou Lumenick New York Post Curtiz' superproduction deserves to be far better known as the supreme example of haute Hollywood craftsmanship deployed for the sort of propaganda commonly associated with films from the Soviet Union and other totalitarian regimes. Rated: 3.5/4 Apr 11, 2015 Full Review Dennis Schwartz Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews A fascinating propaganda film released during World War II. Rated: B+ Apr 18, 2012 Full Review Read all reviews

      Audience Reviews

      View All (9) audience reviews
      Steve D One of the worst things ever put to film. Rated 0.5 out of 5 stars 01/17/24 Full Review Audience Member A realistic and honest presentation of the Soviet Union of the 1930s which prepared its struggle against Nazi fascism and racism. The questionable point of this period is mentioned with honesty. Excellent movie. Aged better than Casablanca. Rated 5 out of 5 stars 01/24/23 Full Review s r An unusual pro Russia film told through the story of a former U.S. Ambassador. It embraces pres Wilton's liberalism and idea of world peace genuinely. Then appealed to the audience by equating it with Christianity. Fascinating story, but certainly not timeless. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 03/31/23 Full Review Audience Member A fascinating propaganda film released during World War II. Rated 3 out of 5 stars 01/21/23 Full Review Audience Member I doubt Stalin himself could have commissioned a film more supportive of his regime and the soviet union of the time. Even the purges and show trials are portrayed as a fair process with Trotsky convicted in absentia of being a fascist patsy. Whilst doubtless necessary to sanitise the soviet union in the eyes of the American populace it is hard to imagine that it would have been effective. Even the most anti fascist of the American populace would recognise this as the pure propaganda that it is. But the film is fascinating for those interested in the politics of the time, Rated 3 out of 5 stars 01/28/23 Full Review Audience Member It's uh--wow. Michael Curtiz, fresh off of Casablanca, directed this, and with all the energy and speed he poured into the project, it moves as swiftly as quick-drying cement. Politics, politics, politics, the occasional cameo by a world leader (played by some actor in thick makeup). Only thing that makes it bearable is Walter Huston, looking as earnest as all his actorly powers can manage, which is considerable. He cares, and his expression suggests that you should care too. It's propaganda, of course. That they could have treated the material straight (I'm talking hypothetical--Davies had control, and the president himself asked Warner for this effort) and it would be more compelling stuff--allying with a mass murderer in charged of a fascistic country--that's the stuff of epic drama. Watching the actual results, the vast whitewashing and ass-kissing involved, that's a different kind of epic drama, more jaw-dropping for sure. Rated 2 out of 5 stars 01/31/23 Full Review Read all reviews Post a rating

      Cast & Crew

      Movie Info

      Synopsis Joseph E. Davies (Walter Huston) is the American ambassador to the Soviet Union between World War I and World War II. Moving to the communist state, Davies records his impressions of Soviet life, politics and foreign policy. He and his family adjust to their new home, while maintaining their American values. Made at the behest of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the film served to familiarize the American public with the Soviet Union, who were key allies at the time of production.
      Director
      Michael Curtiz
      Producer
      Robert Buckner
      Distributor
      Warner Bros. Pictures
      Production Co
      Warner Bros.
      Genre
      History, Drama
      Original Language
      English
      Release Date (Theaters)
      May 22, 1943, Original
      Release Date (DVD)
      Oct 20, 2009
      Runtime
      2h 3m