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      Monday Morning

      2002 2h 3m Comedy Drama List
      71% Tomatometer 7 Reviews 74% Audience Score 250+ Ratings Vincent (Jacques Bidou) provides for his family by working at an oppressive factory, finding escape only in painting. At home, his wife (Anne Kravz-Tarnavsky) constantly bothers him about chores, while his sons ignore him. After walking away from his job, Vincent takes a trip to Venice to visit his father's friend, Enzo (Otar Iosseliani), and strikes up an acquaintance with Carlo (Arrigo Mozzo), a worker whose routine in the new city is disappointingly like Vincent's regular existence. Read More Read Less

      Critics Reviews

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      Empire Magazine Rated: 4/5 Dec 30, 2006 Full Review Jamie Russell BBC.com After two hours of this languorous farce, most viewers will wish Ioseliani had kept such ponderous ideas to himself. Rated: 2/5 Nov 22, 2002 Full Review Ed Gonzalez Slant Magazine Monday Morning is Otar Iosseliani's unmistakable homage to Jacques Tati. Rated: 3/4 Oct 8, 2002 Full Review Chris Wiegand Boxoffice Magazine Such quirky characters and humorous observations give this slight diversion plenty of precious moments. Rated: 3/5 Jul 18, 2005 Full Review Josh Ralske All Movie Guide There's...an underlying Old World sexism to Monday Morning that undercuts its charm. Rated: 5/10 Feb 2, 2003 Full Review Jeremy Heilman MovieMartyr.com This is a film about the irksome, tiresome nature of complacency that remains utterly satisfied to remain the same throughout. Even as the hero of the story rediscovers his passion in life, the mood remains oddly detached. Rated: 2/4 Oct 18, 2002 Full Review Read all reviews

      Audience Reviews

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      Audience Member The mundane life pushes a man to an escape. A French man is fed up with his monotonous life, quietly slips away from his family for liberation in Venice. On a grand scale, this is a film about human compromise to live in society (work, family) with spirituality. When Vincent can no longer hold his yearning for freedom, he opts for an irresponsible journey to recharge the optimism of life, even though it must trades with the suffering of other family members. Albeit the dependency of Vincent's wife, his journey mildly resembled my decision to study abroad. Human yearns for changes and adventures, but for only so long homesickness would insist. For those lucky enough to have a "home," comfort and familiarity tempt for return. Liberty and settlement are to be balanced; but in modern society where freedom rarely come with daily routines, depression is ticking away like a time bomb. The "weekend getaways" and "holiday homes" offer artificial escape of modern monotony, but are necessary because we cannot afford "real" adventures that would collapse the ever-important financial security, social foundation. When Vincent stated that drinking wines in France is gastronomical, but spiritual in Italy, the essence of the film was right there. To break the chains is to intensify the will to live, for certain beauty can be experienced as such. I loved how Iosseliani assigned the existential role to the masculine (Vincent) gender, while the passive aggressor to the female (wife). In modern times, husbands are stereotyped to be monetary hunters with wives playing the mother/housekeeper hybrid. (Of course the power structure of gender is constantly reshaping as seen by the Feminist movement, increase of financially successful female figures, and general liberalism.) Vincent and his wife can also be labeled as such; but due to Vincent's artistic nature, his threshold for imprisonment is low. Being chronically repressed, the limit break turns him completely irresponsible--he was desperate for a soulful recharge. What I loved most when he returns home after being "cured" in Venice is how his wife, obviously still bitter, ultimately understood why her husband left without telling. She knew that her husband had sacrificed greatly, and though she previously took his sacrifice for granted, she now would treat him with tender and forgiveness to show how thankful she'd become. Rated 4 out of 5 stars 02/19/23 Full Review Audience Member I adore his old-fashioned style with no close-ups, stories full of irony and humour! Rated 4 out of 5 stars 01/25/23 Full Review Audience Member Interesting story about an ordinary man in France who didn't feel like going to work on Monday morning so he went to Italy for two days. He then went back home and went to work the next day as normal. Pace is really slow, but it is realistc and the man is a good actor. Rated 3 out of 5 stars 01/21/23 Full Review Audience Member Too slow-moving for my liking... Rated 2 out of 5 stars 02/20/23 Full Review Audience Member excellent movie about life Rated 4 out of 5 stars 02/25/23 Full Review Audience Member Beautiful, Iosseliani-like delicacy... Rated 5 out of 5 stars 02/12/23 Full Review Read all reviews
      Monday Morning

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      Movie Info

      Synopsis Vincent (Jacques Bidou) provides for his family by working at an oppressive factory, finding escape only in painting. At home, his wife (Anne Kravz-Tarnavsky) constantly bothers him about chores, while his sons ignore him. After walking away from his job, Vincent takes a trip to Venice to visit his father's friend, Enzo (Otar Iosseliani), and strikes up an acquaintance with Carlo (Arrigo Mozzo), a worker whose routine in the new city is disappointingly like Vincent's regular existence.
      Director
      Otar Iosseliani
      Producer
      Roberto Cicutto, Martine Marignac, Luigi Musini, Maurice Tinchant
      Screenwriter
      Otar Iosseliani
      Genre
      Comedy, Drama
      Original Language
      French (Canada)
      Release Date (DVD)
      May 2, 2006
      Runtime
      2h 3m
      Sound Mix
      Dolby Stereo, Dolby A, Dolby SR, Dolby Digital