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Movie Crazy

Released Sep 23, 1934 1h 35m Comedy List
Reviews 72% Audience Score 100+ Ratings
Due to a clerical error, Harold (Harold Lloyd), a bumbling small-town chap with Hollywood dreams, is invited to a film audition in Los Angeles. His screen test is a disaster, but he's hired as a film extra. He begins a romance with actress Mary (Constance Cummings), not recognizing her as the "Spanish Lady," the heavily-costumed female lead in the movie he's in. On set, Mary uses her sultry alter ego to toy with Harold, who becomes so flustered that he blunders his way to comic stardom. Read More Read Less

Critics Reviews

View All (4) Critics Reviews
Bob Thomas Associated Press The film doesn't show its age. It proves my old thesis: They don't make comedies like they used to. Jul 25, 2019 Full Review Pare Lorentz Vanity Fair Mr. Lawrence writes about the best love scenes to be found in these parts, and this quality, added to Lloyd's usual good slapstick direction, makes it superior to anything he has done in talking pictures. May 31, 2019 Full Review Charles Davy The Spectator Mr. Lloyd may lose a few admirers by abandoning his old slapstick style, but he has invented a somewhat new type of melodramatic comedy, perhaps more promising for the future. Oct 4, 2018 Full Review Dennis Schwartz Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews Silent comedy star Harold Lloyd's best talkie. Rated: C+ Mar 24, 2008 Full Review Read all reviews

Audience Reviews

View All (14) audience reviews
Audience Member The best comedy movie ever made! Rated 5 out of 5 stars 02/26/23 Full Review Audience Member An entertaining little film. I recommend watching it without thinking of the silent film star Harold Lloyd, or measuring his performance to some expectation you may have. Just enjoy a nice little romantic comedy with a beautiful leading lady, some behind the scenes looks at Hollywood sets from the day, and some funny gags. Nothing hysterical, but clever and had me chuckling at times. Constance Cummings is fantastic in what is practically a dual role here. She plays a Hollywood actress that Lloyd falls for in her Spanish makeup, and befriends in her 'normal life'. Of course, the latter isn't until after he's lost a shoe in the rain, splashed mud all over her, and wrecked the top of her convertible, in a very nice sequence. She takes pity on him, nicknaming him 'Trouble', and is drawn to his unaffected, honest way. That honesty is put to a test, however, when she questions him about his interactions with the 'Spanish actress', knowing full well what he's said and done with her. These scenes where she tests Lloyd's loyalty are excellent, and the dialogue and emotions between the two are highly authentic. There is a certain sweetness to the film, but it's not cloying. As for gags, the attempts Lloyd's character makes to get into the film industry are amusing, starting with being an extra in a scene practically moments after he's gotten off the train into town (lol), and continuing on to a screen test with 26 takes. The actress in the screen test with him (Mary Doran) is motivated because of a past slight on her sex appeal, but after she says to the director "Then lead me to it, baby! I'll show you flame enough to burn that bird up alive", he proceeds to stumbles all over, and can't manage to even answer the phone in the scene without destroying the set. The scene at the party where Lloyd is inadvertently wearing the magician's coat is probably the funniest, as its contents (eggs, mice, rabbits, etc) are dispensed one by one. The film is well put together and has some interesting camera angles. I found it interesting that Lloyd had to direct quite a bit of it because credited director Clyde Bruckman was regularly intoxicated. The film isn't the pinnacle of Lloyd's career or the best of the pre-Code comedies you'll find, but it's solid and worth seeing. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 01/13/23 Full Review s r I have a soft spot for Lloyd, even if it's not as good as his others. Rated 2.5 out of 5 stars 03/31/23 Full Review Audience Member It's odd how Harold Lloyds talkies have aged much less well than even the least of his Silent features. Nevertheless, with likeable characters and some fun, inventive visual gags, it's entertaining enough. The finale fight in a movie studio is lacking a musical score, an oversight which would have enhanced that scene a lot. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 01/17/23 Full Review Audience Member Lloyd's brand of physical comedy helps keep this fun and interesting. Rated 4 out of 5 stars 01/21/23 Full Review Audience Member lloyd's best sound film good comedy! Rated 3 out of 5 stars 01/21/23 Full Review Read all reviews
Movie Crazy

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Cast & Crew

Movie Info

Synopsis Due to a clerical error, Harold (Harold Lloyd), a bumbling small-town chap with Hollywood dreams, is invited to a film audition in Los Angeles. His screen test is a disaster, but he's hired as a film extra. He begins a romance with actress Mary (Constance Cummings), not recognizing her as the "Spanish Lady," the heavily-costumed female lead in the movie he's in. On set, Mary uses her sultry alter ego to toy with Harold, who becomes so flustered that he blunders his way to comic stardom.
Director
Harold Lloyd, Clyde Bruckman
Producer
Jeffrey Vance, Harold Lloyd
Screenwriter
John Grey, Agnes Christine Johnston, Felix Adler, Vincent Lawrence, Clyde Bruckman, Lex Neal, Frank Terry
Distributor
Monarch Films, Paramount Pictures
Production Co
Paramount Pictures, The Harold Lloyd Corporation
Genre
Comedy
Original Language
English
Release Date (Theaters)
Sep 23, 1934, Wide
Runtime
1h 35m
Sound Mix
Mono