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      Rapt

      Released Jul 6, 2011 2 hr. 5 min. Drama List
      97% 35 Reviews Tomatometer 66% 500+ Ratings Audience Score Philandering industrialist Stanislas Graff (Yvan Attal) is kidnapped, with his ransom set at 50 million euros. After his finger is chopped off to prove the abductors' seriousness, his wife, Francoise (Anne Consigny), meets with the board of directors to discuss how to raise the money quickly -- but evidence of Stanislas' adultery and gambling make the company reluctant to pay. As rumors spread that Stanislas staged the kidnapping to take care of his debts, public sentiment turns against him. Read More Read Less

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      Rapt

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      Audience Reviews

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      nicolas b Rather classic kidnapping story. What makes it interesting is the afermath, which sadly the movie doesn't focus on. Yvan Attals performance is pretty intense. Rated 3 out of 5 stars 03/30/23 Full Review Audience Member Works as a story of a kidnapping as well as one that looks critically at a society that dictates its terms of morality... Rated 4 out of 5 stars 01/26/23 Full Review Audience Member Kidnapping thriller loosely based on 1970 crime. Thought provoking and mind bending. On Netflix now. Rated 4 out of 5 stars 02/21/23 Full Review Audience Member there are worse ways to destroy a man's life --let him do the job himself. Rated 4.5 out of 5 stars 02/02/23 Full Review Audience Member Rapt (Lucas Belvaux, 2009) I loved-and I mean really, really loved-all the places that Rapt was going. Which makes it all the more depressing that it never got to any of them. Which is not to say that what we got is not a watchable, if bog-standard, thriller, but it occurred to me more than once while I was watching it that had Belvaux, who also wrote the script, gotten together with Simon Hynd, who adapted (relatively well) Stona Fitch's novel Senseless for the screen, the two of them could have come up with the perfect abduction thriller. Alas, it was not to be. The plot: Stanislas Graff (The Interpreter's Yvan Attal), a high-powered businessman who has the French president's ear, is kidnapped and held for a 50 million euro ransom. But things start going wrong from the outset. The kidnappers seem to be working from false information, Stanislas' company's board of directors would rather negotiate terms than actually pay the money, and the longer Stansilas remains in captivity, the more of a field day the press is having with digging up the unsavory details of his provate life, to the point where the kidnappers start wondering: is this guy worth a plugged nickel, much less 50 million euros? The obvious first thing here is to give kudos to Belvaux for playing it straight; I can't imagine how much temptation there must have been to turn this into a farce, or at least a Reservoir Dogs or A Touch of Larceny-style satire. (And this movie reminded me of the latter more than once, I have to say.) On the other hand, he didn't give us enough character development, especially with the lead kidnapper, to turn this into the kind of talk-piece Belvaux seemed to be aiming for. That's why I started thinking about the flaws in Senseless, which I watched less than a month before seeing this, and by the time the movie was over I'd started seeing them as complementary pieces; those things Senseless did wrong, for the most part, Rapt got right, and vice versa, so putting the two together would have worked very well indeed. But neither is a bad film on its own; Rapt is very ambitious, though it often doesn't seem so. And where its characters are well-drawn, you can see flashes of the movie this should have been; they make it worth your while. ** 1/2 Rated 2.5 out of 5 stars 02/11/23 Full Review Audience Member An oddly twisted thriller. Rated 3 out of 5 stars 02/02/23 Full Review Read all reviews Post a rating

      Cast & Crew

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      Critics Reviews

      View All (35) Critics Reviews
      Nicolas Rapold Film Comment Magazine Belvaux establishes the professionalism of the kidnappers and observes the poker-faced boardroom violence of Stanislas's firm. A late attempt at Chabrolian irony doesn't take, but the story is entertainingly tense while it lasts. Jul 1, 2013 Full Review Mark Feeney Boston Globe "Rapt'' is smooth, cool, and efficient. It's a movie with very little wasted motion - or, for much of its length, wasted emotion. Rated: 3/4 Sep 15, 2011 Full Review Roger Ebert Chicago Sun-Times What lends "Rapt" its fascination is that it represents such a dramatic fall from grace for its hero. Rated: 3/4 Sep 1, 2011 Full Review C.J. Prince Way Too Indie Belvaux writes his characters in shades of greys, and his cast is smart enough to play on that moral ambiguity as much as possible. Rated: 7.5/10 Jul 3, 2019 Full Review Amie Simon Three Imaginary Girls Beautifully acted and shot, it definitely had me on the edge of my seat until the end. Mar 9, 2019 Full Review Stephen Saito Moveable Fest For a film that's so steeped in our relationship with acquiring wealth, "Rapt"'s greatest quality is that it's richly told. Dec 17, 2018 Full Review Read all reviews

      Movie Info

      Synopsis Philandering industrialist Stanislas Graff (Yvan Attal) is kidnapped, with his ransom set at 50 million euros. After his finger is chopped off to prove the abductors' seriousness, his wife, Francoise (Anne Consigny), meets with the board of directors to discuss how to raise the money quickly -- but evidence of Stanislas' adultery and gambling make the company reluctant to pay. As rumors spread that Stanislas staged the kidnapping to take care of his debts, public sentiment turns against him.
      Director
      Lucas Belvaux
      Screenwriter
      Lucas Belvaux, Lucas Belvaux
      Distributor
      Lorber Films
      Genre
      Drama
      Original Language
      French (France)
      Release Date (Theaters)
      Jul 6, 2011, Limited
      Release Date (Streaming)
      Feb 9, 2017
      Box Office (Gross USA)
      $45.7K
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