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      Twelfth Night

      PG 1996 2h 14m Comedy Drama List
      76% Tomatometer 34 Reviews 80% Audience Score 5,000+ Ratings A shipwreck separates Viola (Imogen Stubbs) from her twin brother, Sebastian (Steven Mackintosh). Believing him to be dead, Viola disguises herself as a boy and goes to work for Duke Orsino (Toby Stephens), whom she loves. The object of the duke's heart, Olivia (Helena Bonham Carter), does not reciprocate his feelings -- however, she falls madly for Viola, whose true gender she doesn't know. Meanwhile, Olivia's uncle, Sir Toby (Mel Smith), manipulates all of their entangled relationships. Read More Read Less Watch on Fandango at Home Buy Now

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      Twelfth Night

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      Critics Consensus

      Director Trevor Nunn makes some questionable choices, but his stellar cast -- which includes Helena Bonham-Carter, Ben Kingsley, and Nigel Hawthorne -- more than rises to the material.

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      Critics Reviews

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      Todd McCarthy Variety A handsome, agreeably performed rendition that fails to ignite much laughter or any real emotion. Jul 6, 2008 Full Review Geoff Andrew Time Out The direction is assured, and the cast is masterly. Feb 9, 2006 Full Review Stephen Holden New York Times A comic meditation on desire, disguise and inherent bisexuality. May 20, 2003 Full Review Adam Sandel Santa Cruz Sentinel Even if you don't know the play, or don't "speak Shakespeare," you're in for a lively, rewarding experience. Rated: A- Feb 22, 2019 Full Review Geoffrey O'Brien The New York Review of Books Nunn's film succeeds beautifully in its chosen course. Aug 16, 2018 Full Review Malcolm Johnson Hartford Courant Staring sardonically into the camera, Kingsley's cool fool gives this Victorian fantasy a modern edge, as a bitter commentator who dimly views romantic love as quite absurd. Rated: 5/5 Apr 25, 2018 Full Review Read all reviews

      Audience Reviews

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      Audience Member Who says the old Shakespeare days can't be funny? In the late 19th century a shipwreck separates Viola (Imogen Stubbs) from her twin brother, Sebastian (Steven Mackintosh) Viola disguises herself as a boy and goes to work for Duke Orsino (Toby Stephens), whom she loves The object of the duke's heart, Olivia (Helena Bonham Carter), does not reciprocate his feelings -- however, she falls madly for Viola, whose true gender she doesn't know Meanwhile, Olivia's uncle, Sir Toby (Mel Smith), manipulates all of their entangled relationships Ben Kingsley plays Feste, the fool in Olivia's castle Hijinks ensue and wacky romantic misunderstandings take hold This plays as a romantic comedy involving gender confusion with a woman looking like a man having a woman fall in love for the supposed-man Trevor Nunn makes a few off decisions regarding the play but the actors rise above most of the material given It's a practice of meditation on desire, disguise and inherent bisexuality Lots of discussing how things play out that's for certain but Shakespeare lovers are in for a treat Rated 2.5 out of 5 stars 01/22/23 Full Review rory s I loved this movie. It was a charming movie. With bravo performances from the actors and actresses. Rated 5 out of 5 stars 03/31/23 Full Review Audience Member Twelfth Night is passable. While some of the performances are a bit silly, nothing about the film is terrible. Rather the problem is that the parts are not played with much harmony. However, Helena Bonham Carter's acting, as always, is delectable. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 01/15/23 Full Review Audience Member The movie did much to address some of the things about the play that left me reluctant, by adding a denouement and emotional beats I felt the play was lacking at the end. The end of the movie is wonderfully emotional and appealing. As for the performances, they were all wonderful. Ben Kingsley as Feste played the character in a different way than I expected, with a lot of unresolved pathos despite his foolish ways. His foolish ways are toned down significantly from the play; here he seems more like a father figure to Olivia (played by the fabulous Helena Bonham Carter) than her jester. I especially like Feste at the end of the movie, as his own moving forward paralleled the denouement of many other characters, complete with a lively version of the fool's ending song from the play. The movie emphasized the homoerotic undertones of the play with a few key expressions by Antonio and the dramatization of a growing attraction between Viola (a game Imogen Stubbs) and Orsino (Toby Stephens) even while he believes her to be a man. Nigel Hawthorne as Malvolio is excellent, and there is perhaps a little more sympathy for him by the end of the movie than in the play. One of the things that disturbed me about the play were the tricks being played on him. The same left me still disturbed in the adaptation. Does he truly deserve what everyone puts him through? The poor fool. The final thing I appreciate about the movie is how it helped me to better understand the play and suggested my concerns about the play may be somewhat universal. That does not detract from Shakespeare's genius, though. In fact, I feel what left me fretting about the play was trying to understand the genius of his decisions in writing it. It is a complex work, and well worth the effort to read it, and then gain an even greater appreciation for it through performances like this adaptation. Rated 4 out of 5 stars 01/16/23 Full Review Audience Member The butchering and splicing of the original play did little for me but annoy me. Cutting out material and changing words to pander to modern audiences is just speeding along the dumbing down of culture. Also, there are just some weird characterizations and relationships in this version. Rated 2.5 out of 5 stars 01/23/23 Full Review Audience Member http://www.bluestockingbookshelf.com/film/2014/7/29/twelfth-night-1996 Rated 5 out of 5 stars 02/19/23 Full Review Read all reviews
      Twelfth Night

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      Cast & Crew

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      Movie Info

      Synopsis A shipwreck separates Viola (Imogen Stubbs) from her twin brother, Sebastian (Steven Mackintosh). Believing him to be dead, Viola disguises herself as a boy and goes to work for Duke Orsino (Toby Stephens), whom she loves. The object of the duke's heart, Olivia (Helena Bonham Carter), does not reciprocate his feelings -- however, she falls madly for Viola, whose true gender she doesn't know. Meanwhile, Olivia's uncle, Sir Toby (Mel Smith), manipulates all of their entangled relationships.
      Director
      Trevor Nunn
      Producer
      Stephen Evans, David Parfitt
      Screenwriter
      Trevor Nunn, William Shakespeare
      Production Co
      Renaissance Films
      Rating
      PG
      Genre
      Comedy, Drama
      Original Language
      English
      Release Date (Streaming)
      Jun 13, 2016
      Box Office (Gross USA)
      $551.5K
      Runtime
      2h 14m
      Sound Mix
      Surround
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