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      Walk on the Wild Side

      Released Feb 21, 1962 1 hr. 54 min. Drama List
      67% 6 Reviews Tomatometer 61% 1,000+ Ratings Audience Score In the 1930s, lovesick Texan Dove Linkhorn (Laurence Harvey) hits the road to search for his long-lost sweetheart, Hallie Gerard (Capucine). He meets free-spirited Kitty Twist (Jane Fonda) along the way, and she joins him on his trip to New Orleans, where the two find Hallie working at a brothel. When Dove tries to take Hallie away with him, he is confronted by the brothel's possessive madam, Jo Courtney (Barbara Stanwyck), who is unwilling to give up her favorite employee without a fight. Read More Read Less

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      Walk on the Wild Side

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      Audience Reviews

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      helder f This movie is a bit too sluggish. Nothing is straightforward. There's a constant oscillation, a back and forth that makes the movie a bit too slow. Great performances and great moments despite several moments one wants to skip. The innuendo of a lesbian relationship ought to have been daring at the time. The end is just too dramatic and too moralistic, the decency police probably wouldn't have it any other way. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 01/15/24 Full Review steve d A few good performances and not a lot else. Rated 3 out of 5 stars 03/30/23 Full Review Audience Member A very entertaining melodrama with an all star cast. Laurence Harvey, Barbara Stanwyck, Jane Fonda, Capucine. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 08/12/22 Full Review Ken R Few people may have appreciated what John Fante and co-writers were trying to portray with this vast improvement on Nelson Algren's trashy novel. Ok, perhaps it was not a good idea to use the title for this film as it was a total rewrite, and driven by far higher ideals than Algren possibly knew existed. As it's presented, we have an idealistic love story, played out during the depression – where struggling people are being torn apart by poverty and the difficulty of simply putting bread on the table. If you want trashy Algren, you won't find it here, and that may have been a mistake for the producers of this fine study of lost love. The superbly transferred B/W Columbia DVD uses a catch phrase on the cover; Love is better when kept secret. They miss the point; Love is only better when it comes dressed in goodness and freely given - anything else is a sham that will eventually disappoint. Marvellous noir director Edward Dmytryk (Crossfire'47) works superbly with master veteran director of photography Joe McDonald (‘The Sand Pebbles '66) together they create a mesmerizing visual cinematic treat. While the subject for its era was borderline taboo, its frank situations are handled with measured tastefulness – this did not sit well with the sensation seekers. The entire cast is as diverse as it is dynamic with international performers matching it with locals. Classically trained Laurence Harvey, while some see as miscast, does well in the role of the son of a Texan minister - on the road searching for his lost love – his character is both honourable and sympathetic. Also excellent are Anne Baxter; a kindly Roadhouse owner, Barbara Stanwyck; as the domineering manager of a New Orleans bordello, Jayne Fonda; as a penniless tramp, Richard Rust; the bordello henchman - along with a string of handpicked professionals and newcomers including Capucine, who is far better than some would have you think, there's even Todd Armstrong (Jason, of the Argonauts). All work well and add sparkle to the indeed dramatic proceedings. Production design & art direction play a big hand in setting the scene for 30's New Orleans with streets lined by vintage cars and trams. This is one of Elmer Bernstein's big early scores, with themes reflecting the full gamut of life's emotions - the arrangements by legendary orchestrators Leo Shuken and Jack Hayes are sensitive and sparkling. Saul Bass's striking ‘cat' main and end title design is not to be missed (and deserves to be thought about!) Brook Benton's fine vocals and rendition of the title song are truly inspiring. Not many critics seem to get this one right – forget the rest, put it to the test, you may be pleasantly surprised. Thanks, Sony for the crystal clear DVD images and super High-Fi sound reproduction but, no thanks, for not including the terrific theatrical trailer, although, can perhaps understand this as the end disclaimer may have also sold this classic to the wrong audience - as distributor produced trailers often do! Rated 4 out of 5 stars 05/24/19 Full Review Audience Member The best movie score ever composed! Rated 5 out of 5 stars 02/26/23 Full Review Audience Member Worth 3 1/2 stars for the Elmer Bernstein score alone. The move? Not so much. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 02/27/23 Full Review Read all reviews Post a rating

      Cast & Crew

      Critics Reviews

      View All (6) Critics Reviews
      Roger Moore Movie Nation Tennessee Williams Lite...But try and take your eyes off Fonda in this melodramatic but rarely sentimental Great Depression tale of women and a Big Easy brothel Rated: 2.5/4 Sep 16, 2023 Full Review Frank J. Avella Edge Media Network Her (Jane Fonda's) role in WOTWS, the petulant street kid turned prostitute Kitty Twist, would prove just how eclectic Fonda could be onscreen, even this early in her career. Her feral performance received the lion's share of the few positive notices. Rated: B Sep 2, 2022 Full Review Janet Graves Photoplay Obviously, it's supposed to be real hot stuff, but we couldn't work up even a lukewarm interest in what would happen to any of its people -- who are either completely vicious or completely wish-washy. Nov 17, 2020 Full Review Steve Crum Video-Reviewmaster.com Sleazy atmosphere prevails with Fonda and Capucine as brothel babes. Rated: 3/5 Mar 8, 2008 Full Review Emanuel Levy EmanuelLevy.Com This lurid, intense drams is pseudo Tennessee Williams, about a Texas drifer and desperate women in his life, but it shows Stanwyck as a lesbian (one of Hollywood's first) and signs of Jane Fonda's talent Rated: B- Jun 29, 2007 Full Review Dennis Schwartz Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews best known for that marvelous opening credit sequence created by Saul Bass. Rated: C+ Aug 2, 2006 Full Review Read all reviews

      Movie Info

      Synopsis In the 1930s, lovesick Texan Dove Linkhorn (Laurence Harvey) hits the road to search for his long-lost sweetheart, Hallie Gerard (Capucine). He meets free-spirited Kitty Twist (Jane Fonda) along the way, and she joins him on his trip to New Orleans, where the two find Hallie working at a brothel. When Dove tries to take Hallie away with him, he is confronted by the brothel's possessive madam, Jo Courtney (Barbara Stanwyck), who is unwilling to give up her favorite employee without a fight.
      Director
      Edward Dmytryk
      Screenwriter
      John Fante, Edmund Morris
      Distributor
      Columbia Pictures
      Production Co
      Columbia
      Genre
      Drama
      Original Language
      English
      Release Date (Theaters)
      Feb 21, 1962, Original
      Release Date (Streaming)
      Mar 8, 2019
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