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      West of the Divide

      Released Feb 15, 1934 54m Western List
      Reviews 40% Audience Score 500+ Ratings Cowpoke Ted Hayden (John Wayne) infiltrates a band of outlaws in order to get close to their ringleader, Mr. Gentry (Lloyd Whitlock) -- the man who murdered his father. Joining Hayden on his mission is his dim but devoted companion, Dusty (George "Gabby" Hayes). But their plan gets complicated when Hayden meets Fay (Virginia Brown Faire), the lovely daughter of rancher Fred Winters (Lafe McKee). Gentry is after the man's land, and he wants Hayden to kill him to get it. Read More Read Less

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      West of the Divide

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      Critics Reviews

      View All (1) Critics Reviews
      Dennis Schwartz Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews John Wayne's best Lone Star film is not that good but it's watchable. Rated: C+ Aug 15, 2005 Full Review Read all reviews

      Audience Reviews

      View All (12) audience reviews
      christopher c. m One of the best of John Wayne's early days. Still the technical issues that the other movies had and I wish it had a music score. But that's age, I wish someone would put these classic on Blu-Ray and clean them up. They are being swept under the carpet and ignored. But it's a good story with fun and some unexpected twists. It deserves more than it's getting. Rated 4.5 out of 5 stars 03/31/23 Full Review Audience Member Classic early John Wayne, Lone Star Production. Rated 4 out of 5 stars 01/27/23 Full Review Audience Member Not bad it was pretty good story Rated 2.5 out of 5 stars 02/07/23 Full Review Audience Member good n fast (54 minutes) western Rated 3 out of 5 stars 01/21/23 Full Review Audience Member "Ted Hayden" (John Wayne) joins an outlaw gang under the guise of a man he found dying to find the one or ones responsible for his father's death. Only to discover the gang leader's is the one responsible, but love and previously unknown family. This is not a bad movie, but may not be for all. First of all, there are a lot of audio problems throughout the film, which is fairly short by today's standards. There are times that you have to strain to hear some performers with weaker voices. I noticed, in a scene at the end of the film, a sound from the microphone when they switched to close-ups of the actors in scene possibly due to changes in the audio. John Wayne is possibly the best performer in this film. He is easily the easiest for the audience to connect with. His sidekick (George "Gabby" Hayes) is, in my opinion, completely forgettable only due to not being on screen much. I also found Virginia Brown Faire, who played Wayne's love interest, to be pretty poor in her performance. I just could not believe her as she said many of her lines. A big problem with this movie is that, due to the short length of the movie (under an hour), there was just not enough time to develop the characters or any subplot. If you ask me, the romantic subplot was really rushed. There was just no time to expand any of the main plot as well. The chemistry between performers was pretty good. I would have liked to have seen more between Wayne and Hayes, as well as Wayne and the young boy who Wayne's character befriends. Due to Faire's lackluster performance, it was hard to believe the relationship between her and Wayne at times. Like the audio, the sound effects were pretty bad. There were more fist fights than gun fights in this movie. While you could hear gun shots in this film, it was nearly impossible to hear punches "connect." You have to really strain to hear the smack of the punches apparently connecting during fights, especially when they were fairly distant from the microphone on set. As for wardrobes, they were all pretty nice. However, none of the clothing appeared to have been worn for some time by the people, it looked pretty much new. All the clothing looked really nice though, and fit the classic Old West stereotype created by Hollywood. There was absolutely no music in this film. Music could have helped enhance the mood of some scenes, but because the movie was from the early days of Hollywood, it wasn't needed. There is an extremely little amount of violence in this movie. Due to the time it was made, there is absolutely no blood. The most violent thing in the entire film is a fist fight. Parents, young children could watch this without you worrying about an excessive amount of blood. This movie wasn't bad, but it's far from perfect. Fans of "The Duke" will probably like this a lot more than others. However, his fans will most likely enjoy it more. Rated 2.5 out of 5 stars 02/17/23 Full Review Audience Member "Ted Hayden" (John Wayne) joins an outlaw gang under the guise of a man he found dying to find the one or ones responsible for his father's death. Only to discover the gang leader's is the one responsible, but love and previously unknown family. This is not a bad movie, but may not be for all. First of all, there are a lot of audio problems throughout the film, which is fairly short by today's standards. There are times that you have to strain to hear some performers with weaker voices. I noticed, in a scene at the end of the film, a sound from the microphone when they switched to close-ups of the actors in scene possibly due to changes in the audio. John Wayne is possibly the best performer in this film. He is easily the easiest for the audience to connect with. His sidekick (George "Gabby" Hayes) is, in my opinion, completely forgettable only due to not being on screen much. I also found Virginia Brown Faire, who played Wayne's love interest, to be pretty poor in her performance. I just could not believe her as she said many of her lines. A big problem with this movie is that, due to the short length of the movie (under an hour), there was just not enough time to develop the characters or any subplot. If you ask me, the romantic subplot was really rushed. There was just no time to expand any of the main plot as well. The chemistry between performers was pretty good. I would have liked to have seen more between Wayne and Hayes, as well as Wayne and the young boy who Wayne's character befriends. Due to Faire's lackluster performance, it was hard to believe the relationship between her and Wayne at times. Like the audio, the sound effects were pretty bad. There were more fist fights than gun fights in this movie. While you could hear gun shots in this film, it was nearly impossible to hear punches "connect." You have to really strain to hear the smack of the punches apparently connecting during fights, especially when they were fairly distant from the microphone on set. As for wardrobes, they were all pretty nice. However, none of the clothing appeared to have been worn for some time by the people, it looked pretty much new. All the clothing looked really nice though, and fit the classic Old West stereotype created by Hollywood. There was absolutely no music in this film. Music could have helped enhance the mood of some scenes, but because the movie was from the early days of Hollywood, it wasn't needed. There is an extremely little amount of violence in this movie. Due to the time it was made, there is absolutely no blood. The most violent thing in the entire film is a fist fight. Parents, young children could watch this without you worrying about an excessive amount of blood. This movie wasn't bad, but it's far from perfect. Fans of "The Duke" will probably like this a lot more than others. However, his fans will most likely enjoy it more. Rated 1.5 out of 5 stars 02/21/23 Full Review Read all reviews Post a rating

      Cast & Crew

      Movie Info

      Synopsis Cowpoke Ted Hayden (John Wayne) infiltrates a band of outlaws in order to get close to their ringleader, Mr. Gentry (Lloyd Whitlock) -- the man who murdered his father. Joining Hayden on his mission is his dim but devoted companion, Dusty (George "Gabby" Hayes). But their plan gets complicated when Hayden meets Fay (Virginia Brown Faire), the lovely daughter of rancher Fred Winters (Lafe McKee). Gentry is after the man's land, and he wants Hayden to kill him to get it.
      Director
      Robert N. Bradbury
      Screenwriter
      Robert N. Bradbury
      Production Co
      Lone Star
      Genre
      Western
      Original Language
      English
      Release Date (Theaters)
      Feb 15, 1934, Limited
      Release Date (Streaming)
      Aug 11, 2016
      Runtime
      54m
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