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      The Trip

      Released Aug 23, 1967 1h 25m Fantasy List
      39% Tomatometer 23 Reviews 52% Audience Score 2,500+ Ratings Paul (Peter Fonda), a director saddened by his failed marriage and unsatisfied with his work, is looking to start over. His friend, the cool, sage-like John (Bruce Dern), suggests that an LSD trip is exactly what Paul needs to get out of his rut. Paul decides to indulge, and experiences visions that are alternately beautiful and terrifying. His hallucinations, which include a carnival populated by dwarfs, bizarrely erotic encounters and even his own death, radically reshape his consciousness. Read More Read Less

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      The Trip

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      Critics Consensus

      The Trip's groovy effects and compelling message can't overcome the rough acting, long meandering stretches, and pedestrian plot.

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      Critics Reviews

      View All (23) Critics Reviews
      TIME Staff TIME Magazine The Trip is a psychedelic tour through the bent mind of Peter Fonda, which is evidently full of old movies. Feb 25, 2019 Full Review Variety Staff Variety Unconnected scenes begin to spin off the screen with increasing speed and with no attempt at explanation. Jul 7, 2010 Full Review Bosley Crowther New York Times In trying to visualize a notion of what Peter Fonda goes through on an LSD trip, Roger Corman has simply resorted to a long succession of familiar cinematic images, accompanied by weird music and sounds. Oct 13, 2007 Full Review Gene Youngblood Los Angeles Free Press This is simply a beautiful movie about a fellow who takes an acid trip - with all its ups and downs. Feb 3, 2020 Full Review Wendy Michener Maclean's Magazine Some of the camera tricks are corny, but Corman has created one of the most lyrical expressions of sexual pleasure I've seen in the movies, and it's all perfectly decent, too, thanks to prisms and projections. Mar 26, 2019 Full Review TV Guide Staff TV Guide These images more closely resemble a bad dream following an overdose of pepperoni-and-onion pizza than the result of ingesting hallucinogenic drugs. Rated: 1.5/5 Feb 25, 2019 Full Review Read all reviews

      Audience Reviews

      View All (119) audience reviews
      Matthew D A visual feast, but not much of a movie. Rated 2.5 out of 5 stars 06/18/21 Full Review Audience Member What the hell did I just watch? Peter Fonda on a acid trip in the 60's sounded like it would be interesting. Turns out I was confused by this movie, probably only made sense to people on acid idk I only watched this movie once and once is more then enough, don't even watch this movie once. Rated 0.5 out of 5 stars 01/16/23 Full Review Audience Member This is the OTHER Peter Fonda, Jack Nicholson, and Dennis Hopper hippy flick, and it's far more obnoxiously styled and insecure than its successor. Perhaps my lack of hallucinogenic drug-use will be apparent, but compared with, say, Midsommar, this never came close to putting me in that state. The dated tripping scenes, of which most of this movie is comprised, range from boring to straight-up laughable; I kept expecting Austin Powers to pop-up. Rated 1.5 out of 5 stars 02/24/23 Full Review Audience Member Oversimplifies in some respects and is downright misleading in others. Kudos to them for trying, but tripping is an individualized, altered perception, multi-sensory experience that just can't be truly captured on film. Rated 2.5 out of 5 stars 01/19/23 Full Review emile h A lot of LSD was taken and it shows, though it makes for some great imagery. It's like the film nobody wants: long, strange, and definitely a trip. Thus, Roger Corman is able to tackle the subject by giving the mind a chance to freak out to the written exploits taken by Jack Nicholson. It's the vision tampered with by its own experiences, which is why it's so worth watching on any day or night. Rated 5 out of 5 stars 03/31/23 Full Review Audience Member Now, let me get something straight with you people reading this 4.5 review of this film. This movie is definitely a B-movie Roger Corman psychsploitation movie from *the* psychedelic year, 1967. Which is to say that technically it's not good by almost any standard now and is in some places hilariously dated (almost every character says "groovy" and uses hippy dippy philosophical language). So why do I nearly give it five stars? Well, *because* it's a 1967 psychsploitation B-movie, and it does almost the best job of that that you really can. Some of the trip scenes look like "soft-focus tinsel, Lite Brite, and secondhand Vincent Price dungeons" in the words of Charles Cassady, and the ending was a studio forced "don't do drugs" PSA, but the film still remains startling and powerful despite these issues. The imagery is memorable and creative at its best, with some astonishing editing that cuts in and out of images at a wild pace. Jack Nicholson wrote the screenplay for this film, as he did with one of my all time favorite films, "Head." The film is unfortunately more tiring and repetitive at times than "Head," which was certainly a much more accomplished masterpiece. While the words in this film are not brilliant and the plot is threadbare (as one should hope with a drug trip movie), it does a perfect job of capturing an era. This is really what it boils down to for me. The movie has a lot of faults if you're a staunch modern critic who wants everything done your way, but looking at it through the lens of just seeing a fun psychedelic B-movie with some stunning visuals from the height of the era, then you're going to walk away happy with the experience. I also give props to the tagline for the film, which may be one of the best of all time: "A Lovely Sort of Death." Why has no one used that for an album title? Rated 4.5 out of 5 stars 02/07/23 Full Review Read all reviews Post a rating

      Cast & Crew

      63% 27% The People That Time Forgot 55% 62% Charly 97% 92% 8 1/2 53% 52% Finian's Rainbow 86% 78% 7 Faces of Dr. Lao Discover more movies and TV shows. View More

      Movie Info

      Synopsis Paul (Peter Fonda), a director saddened by his failed marriage and unsatisfied with his work, is looking to start over. His friend, the cool, sage-like John (Bruce Dern), suggests that an LSD trip is exactly what Paul needs to get out of his rut. Paul decides to indulge, and experiences visions that are alternately beautiful and terrifying. His hallucinations, which include a carnival populated by dwarfs, bizarrely erotic encounters and even his own death, radically reshape his consciousness.
      Director
      Roger Corman
      Producer
      Roger Corman
      Screenwriter
      Jack Nicholson
      Distributor
      Paramount Pictures, MGM/UA Home Entertainment Inc.
      Production Co
      American International Pictures (AIP)
      Genre
      Fantasy
      Original Language
      English
      Release Date (Theaters)
      Aug 23, 1967, Original
      Release Date (Streaming)
      May 4, 2017
      Box Office (Gross USA)
      $29.5K
      Runtime
      1h 25m
      Sound Mix
      Mono
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