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      Bamako

      2006 1 hr. 58 min. Drama List
      84% 57 Reviews Tomatometer 70% 1,000+ Ratings Audience Score Her marriage on the rocks, cabaret singer Mele (Aïssa Maïga) returns home after a degrading night of work and finds her apartment complex transformed into an elaborate tribunal in which the institutions of international capitalism are being put on trial. Her sister (Djénéba Koné) stands up alongside peasants, farmers and other citizens, appealing to the bureaucrats of the international banking cabal. A long night in pursuit of justice is offset by a sultry evening of Malian life. Read More Read Less

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      Bamako

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      Bamako

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      Critics Consensus

      A courtroom drama and a portrait of everyday Mali life, Bamako approaches both subjects with equal skill and success.

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      Audience Reviews

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      martin f I didn't know much about this movie before watching it so I was no expecting it having such a strong focus on the courtroom drama. Despite taking place in Mali, Bamako takes the heavy responsibility to talk in the name of the whole African continent and against the rest of the world. The argumentation is great and well-brought, it gives you an understanding on how African countries are treated by developed nation limiting their own development. The courtroom, cleverly, takes place in a backyard which gives you a vision of the African's rustic reality. The courtroom drama is sometimes cut with Bamako daily life scenes, that somewhat are connected into a subplot about a couple but this story doesn't have any weight and it's too easy to ignore despite a mesmerizing scene with Aïssa Maïga singing. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 03/30/23 Full Review david l Abderrahmane Sissako's Bamako is a courtroom drama that is too limited in scope, thus it would have served better as a stage play. Still, this is a heartbreaking, thematically important movie that is commendable how honest it is about all major African problems such as government corruption and poverty, but the director most extensively criticized the horrible role of the West in the stifled development of this continent, thus making the film admirably anti-globalist in its messaging. Rated 4 out of 5 stars 03/31/23 Full Review Audience Member Interesting arguments! Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 02/03/23 Full Review Audience Member good stuff great voice too Rated 3 out of 5 stars 01/21/23 Full Review Audience Member Odd and at time fervent movie about social injustice in Africa instrumentalized by Western (northern!) international organizations. The film is embedded in a bizarre/surreal setting in a back courtyard with all sorts of things interfering with the proceedings of the hearing. Difficult to get into at the beginning, but it grows on you, and I do believe to have received a good dose of African life with all its ups, downs and sometimes infuriatingly frustrating circumstances. It helps if you are rudimentarily familiar with economic theory. Rated 4 out of 5 stars 01/27/23 Full Review Audience Member La puissance du cinema africain. Vraiment très beau. Rated 4 out of 5 stars 02/13/23 Full Review Read all reviews Post a rating

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      Critics Reviews

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      Richard Brody New Yorker A courtroom drama with a difference. Apr 18, 2016 Full Review Jeff Shannon Seattle Times Unlike other recent films about the plight of Africa, Bamako channels its outrage more directly, yet with greater subtlety, by recruiting real-life witnesses to Africa's economic crises. Rated: 3/4 Aug 10, 2007 Full Review Marjorie Baumgarten Austin Chronicle Dramatic features born and bred on the African continent are rare commodities on these shores, and the opportunities they offer can stretch far beyond film appreciation and into the realm of world understanding. Rated: 3.5/5 Jun 22, 2007 Full Review David Walsh World Socialist Web Site The work has many strong and honest moments, and striking images. The filmmaker does not idealize anyone, but neither does he indulge in cynicism or despair. Feb 14, 2021 Full Review PJ Nabarro Patrick Nabarro Bamako works because it offers a corrective to the - sometimes unintentionally - condescending western stereotype of Africa as an afflicted and pitiable continent. Rated: 4/5 Jun 3, 2020 Full Review Rob Nelson City Pages, Minneapolis/St. Paul Bamako Puts Globalization on Trial Aug 24, 2009 Full Review Read all reviews

      Movie Info

      Synopsis Her marriage on the rocks, cabaret singer Mele (Aïssa Maïga) returns home after a degrading night of work and finds her apartment complex transformed into an elaborate tribunal in which the institutions of international capitalism are being put on trial. Her sister (Djénéba Koné) stands up alongside peasants, farmers and other citizens, appealing to the bureaucrats of the international banking cabal. A long night in pursuit of justice is offset by a sultry evening of Malian life.
      Director
      Abderrahmane Sissako
      Executive Producer
      Maji-da Abdi, Joslyn Barnes, Danny Glover
      Screenwriter
      Abderrahmane Sissako
      Genre
      Drama
      Original Language
      Bambara
      Release Date (Streaming)
      Dec 22, 2020
      Box Office (Gross USA)
      $112.4K
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