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      The Edge

      2010 2h 3m Drama History List
      Reviews 50% Audience Score 100+ Ratings Following the dark days of World War II, Ignat (Vladimir Mashkov), once the epitome of the unstoppable Soviet machine, arrives at a Siberian labor camp where broken-down men are sent. His only chance at salvation is to overcome his wartime trauma, which had affected his performance as a train engineer. Ignat soon becomes obsessed with the legend of a ghost train on the island nearby, and with the help of a German girl, he sets up a dangerous race between his engine and the phantom. Read More Read Less

      Critics Reviews

      View All (2) Critics Reviews
      Ron Wilkinson Monsters and Critics Tipping on the edge of the tracks and threatening to fall under the weight of its hysterics, this film conveys the darkness and chaos that was post-war Russia. Rated: 7/10 Nov 22, 2011 Full Review Louis Proyect rec.arts.movies.reviews Brilliant film about life in a gulag in 1946 with steam locomotives playing as important and as dramatic a role as the human actors. Oct 29, 2011 Full Review Read all reviews

      Audience Reviews

      View All (13) audience reviews
      Audience Member I'm with Jim Hunter on this one: I too don't really understand this film but would like to know more. I have a lot of questions and perhaps there are people out there who may know the answer. Overall, I would like to know what the underlying 'meaning' of the film is (why did they make it in the first place)? But I have more specific questions. Here's just one: the camp commander (when he returned) said that Stalin was kind to place all those captured by the Germans away from other Soviet people, as they would be killed: is there any truth in this? Were even returning Soviet PoWs really seen as traitors? Despite the fact I didn't understand the whole, there were some sections that were interesting. When Sophie was asked why she had preferred Stepan to her previous boyfriend she said 'there were more devils in him' ... always interesting for men to understand why they sometimes lose in love! The mist of mystery that covers the film may hide things that start to look a little silly in the cool light of hindsight. The fact that Sophie's 'trophy' German child suddenly cheered up when he once more heard his mother tongue was a tad sentimental. And how did that German girl survive for more than four years on her own? Maybe I'm being a spoil sport on this ... the film's worth watching, in any case. Rated 3 out of 5 stars 02/02/23 Full Review Audience Member There might be an allegory in here that resonated with Russian audiences without fully translating to international film-goers. There's a perception of control from the absent Fishman, and there's the chaos of main the character, who has some sort of brain trauma. As new people inhabit this makeshift settlement, they upset the uneasy calm and help expose how awful humanity can be. In addition, trains and their engineers try to outdo each other for power, prowess and some semblance of pride. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 02/07/23 Full Review Audience Member A Soviet train engineer hooks up with a German woman in the Siberian hinterland -- much to the disapproval of his Soviet compatriots. I'll start by saying that I'm not sure that I fully understand this film; I think that one might need a more extensive knowledge of Russian post-war history than I have in order to understand this film's context. I can only respond to what I see, which is a hyper-masculine world of competition and an environment of anti-German prejudice. These two themes are explored in the main relationship, but whether the film is critiquing, lauding, or merely presenting these aspects of Russian post-war life is still unclear to me. I can also say that I didn't enjoy the film. There wasn't a lot to like, and I had trouble following it. All of the characters are undesirable people. Overall, as I believe I made clear, I wasn't able to get a good handle on this film. Rated 2 out of 5 stars 02/26/23 Full Review Audience Member Watched it 3 times without subtitles. Still love it. Had a chance to watch a part of it with subtitles and chose to continue without: they took away from the magnificence of the pictures. Love the camera work. If I watch it some more, I start speaking Russian! Rated 5 out of 5 stars 02/15/23 Full Review Audience Member interesting look at brutality and masculinity, but it's more of an assemblence of events than an actual movie. Rated 3 out of 5 stars 01/21/23 Full Review Audience Member I loved the middle and end to this film, but the beginning made no sense to me. The train sequences were amazing... Rated 3 out of 5 stars 02/08/23 Full Review Read all reviews Post a rating

      Cast & Crew

      Movie Info

      Synopsis Following the dark days of World War II, Ignat (Vladimir Mashkov), once the epitome of the unstoppable Soviet machine, arrives at a Siberian labor camp where broken-down men are sent. His only chance at salvation is to overcome his wartime trauma, which had affected his performance as a train engineer. Ignat soon becomes obsessed with the legend of a ghost train on the island nearby, and with the help of a German girl, he sets up a dangerous race between his engine and the phantom.
      Director
      Alexei Uchitel
      Screenwriter
      Aleksandr Gonorovskiy
      Production Co
      Rock Films
      Genre
      Drama, History
      Original Language
      Russian
      Release Date (Streaming)
      Aug 10, 2016
      Runtime
      2h 3m