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      Accattone

      Released Nov 22, 1961 2h 0m Drama List
      100% Tomatometer 16 Reviews 88% Audience Score 1,000+ Ratings In the slums of Rome, Vittorio "Accattone" Cataldi (Franco Citti) supports himself as a pimp for his longtime girlfriend, Maddalena (Silvana Corsini). When his meal ticket goes to jail after being assaulted by a pack of thugs, Accattone scrambles to survive, reduced to begging for food from his ex-wife, Ascenza (Paola Guidi). When he meets the virginal Stella (Franca Pasut), he sees a way back into his former profession. This is the first film by noted Italian director Pier Paolo Pasolini. Read More Read Less

      Critics Reviews

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      Variety Staff Variety This is a fascinating debut by writer-director Pier Paolo Pasolini, who has scripted some interesting pix. Oct 23, 2007 Full Review Time Out The character of Accattone himself, self-destructive and conscious of his situation within a class from which he cannot escape, embodies many of the contradictions in Pasolini's lifetime of coming to terms with Marxism and Catholicism. Jun 24, 2006 Full Review Renata Adler New York Times The result is uneven, but not without distinction. May 9, 2005 Full Review Scott Nye Battleship Pretension Pasolini frequently uses those who push themselves to the margins of society to expose our collective and individual weaknesses, and our determination to maintain the image of order. Jun 29, 2023 Full Review Fernando F. Croce CinePassion At once squalid and exalted Feb 6, 2012 Full Review Cole Smithey ColeSmithey.com Rated: 4/5 Mar 8, 2008 Full Review Read all reviews

      Audience Reviews

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      Fra B Pasolini's first feature is as raw and realistic as the best neorealistic movies and arguably more interesting than most, but its length is unjustified. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 05/06/21 Full Review Audience Member Pasolini's first film as a director; he was previously a poet, writer, and screenwriter; for example, of Fellini's Nights of Cabiria (1957). Similar to that earlier film, Accattone focuses on people living on the lower rungs of society's ladder, but it isn't quite neo-realism. Instead, Pasolini's film has a lyrical and intense quality (and a startling dream sequence) that brings it closer to the films of the arthouse masters (Bergman comes to mind). Accatone himself (a charismatic Franco Citti) is a scumbag, convincing girls to become prostitutes because he doesn't want to work himself (his nickname equates to beggar/exploiter/freeloader). But Pasolini doesn't want to judge him - he shows us Accatone's tender side as well as his weaknesses. We see him try honest physical labour for pay (and give up on it straightaway). In his context, a bunch of shiftless guys on the street, some thieves, mostly the idle poor, he is the class clown, the butt of all jokes -- and he seems to relish it. Despite (or because of) the seediness of the milieu and the transgressive acts on display, the film is mesmerizing and probably shocking for its time (although Pasolini would shock even more in his later films). The cinematography by Tonino Delli Colli is beautiful (though the environs are not); the actors often look straight into the camera offering beautiful portraits for the viewer. In the end, this heightens our sympathy for those who are barely scraping by (and nevertheless often enjoying themselves) in line with Pasolini's Marxist philosophy. A great debut. Rated 4.5 out of 5 stars 02/04/23 Full Review Audience Member A brutalidade e o desespero frígido deste filme de 1962 impacto cru e duro da realidade qur muitos ocultam Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 02/13/23 Full Review Audience Member The St Matthew Passion. The face of Franco Citti. The black and white roman suburb. The first film of Pasolini. Rated 4 out of 5 stars 01/17/23 Full Review Audience Member Pier Paolo Pasolini's first foray into film holds all the hallmarks of the auteur's eventual genius - glimpsed long before he discovered his true calling. Accattone is a tale of desolate wasters in a desolate wasteland, thought to be adapted from the multi-platform poet's early novels. The film plays out like a traditional neo-realist flick, but with a pitch-black twist. Pasolini's neo-realism is gritty, and far grimmer than the great auteur's soul would prove to be in its prime. Accattone is an anti-movement film, yet it aches of a meandering yearning for focus - much like Pasolini's modern-day fans will while watching it. Rated 3 out of 5 stars 02/14/23 Full Review Audience Member "Like most of the Italian Neorealist films of the late nineteen-forties to early sixties, Accattone (Rome: Arco Film, 1961), as a later derivative form of the genre, focuses mainly on the struggle of the marginalized lower classes, as they struggle at the farthest periphery of a more functionally elevated and elite social-cultural community." Rated 5 out of 5 stars 01/27/23 Full Review Read all reviews
      Accattone

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      Movie Info

      Synopsis In the slums of Rome, Vittorio "Accattone" Cataldi (Franco Citti) supports himself as a pimp for his longtime girlfriend, Maddalena (Silvana Corsini). When his meal ticket goes to jail after being assaulted by a pack of thugs, Accattone scrambles to survive, reduced to begging for food from his ex-wife, Ascenza (Paola Guidi). When he meets the virginal Stella (Franca Pasut), he sees a way back into his former profession. This is the first film by noted Italian director Pier Paolo Pasolini.
      Director
      Pier Paolo Pasolini
      Producer
      Alfredo Bini
      Genre
      Drama
      Original Language
      Italian
      Release Date (Theaters)
      Nov 22, 1961, Original
      Rerelease Date (Theaters)
      Apr 4, 1968
      Release Date (Streaming)
      Aug 22, 2019
      Runtime
      2h 0m