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      Andy Warhol's Frankenstein

      R 1973 1h 34m Horror List
      88% Tomatometer 17 Reviews 56% Audience Score 2,500+ Ratings Baron Frankenstein (Udo Kier) dreams of restoring Serbia to glory, so he builds male and female monsters whose children will become the new master race. Determined that they be fruitful, he aims to equip the male body with the brain of someone possessing a powerful libido. Thinking local stable boy Nicholas (Joe Dallesandro) will be perfect, he mistakenly gets the head of Nicholas' pious friend (Srdjan Zelenovic) instead. Meanwhile, Nicholas seduces the baron's wife (Monique van Vooren). Read More Read Less Watch on Fandango at Home Buy Now

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      Critics Reviews

      View All (17) Critics Reviews
      Nora Sayre New York Times This "Frankenstein" drags as much as it camps; "despite a few amusing moments, it fails as a spoof, and the result is only a coy binge in degradation. May 9, 2005 Full Review Dennis Harvey 48 Hills Poker-faced-yet-absurd excesses, and variably earnest, arch, and amateurish performances... Dec 8, 2023 Full Review Rob Gonsalves Rob's Movie Vault The main purpose of this sick, hilarious cult classic (originally shown in 3-D) seems to have been to out-sex and out-gore the Hammer Frankenstein films. Rated: B+ Nov 29, 2022 Full Review Trace Thurman Horror Queers Podcast Good Lord (in a good way). Rated: 3.5/5 Jul 25, 2022 Full Review Joe Lipsett Horror Queers Podcast This delightfully melodramatic 3D film is a lurid camp classic. Complete with scathing class critique, gorgeous long takes, and hot Udo Kier, it's something of a "see it to believe it" film that could never be made now. Rated: 3.5/5 Jul 21, 2022 Full Review Dick Lochte Los Angeles Free Press Contains as much wit as gore, which, let me tell you, is a considerable amount. Dec 13, 2019 Full Review Read all reviews

      Audience Reviews

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      sean s I recently decided to watch "Flesh for Frankenstein" again, which was called "Andy Warhol's Frankenstein" back in the day. This was one of those midnight movies that played the walk in movie circuit when I was in high school back in the early 1980's. It was too messed up to to let into my head like some old John Water's film with an obese drag queen crouching down to eat some hot dog poop off a sidewalk. Save yourself the head ache and slimy feeling this one invokes and ditch this one. Rated 0.5 out of 5 stars 03/31/23 Full Review dave s Flesh for Frankenstein is as campy as a film can be. That doesn't make it a good film, because it's not. Baron Frankenstein (Udo Kier), in an effort to create a new race of perfect humans, creates a pair of zombies (in what he refers to as the "Serbian ideal") with the intent of having them mate. Much to his chagrin, the male creation turns out the be asexual, triggering an unimaginable climax. The movie was at least fun to watch in theaters as a result of the 3-D effects, but seen on television it just comes across as…well…two-dimensional. The acting is brutal, much of the dialogue is unintentionally funny, and the grisly effects lose much of their impact on the small screen. To its benefit, it's sporadically entertaining in a ‘I can't believe I'm watching this' sort of way, but beyond that there is not much to recommend about it. Rated 2 out of 5 stars 03/30/23 Full Review Audience Member Joe Dallesandro is one of those nexus points for so many movies and parts of culture that I love. Born to a Navy man and a mother who was serving fifteen years in a federal pen for auto theft by the time he was five, Joe went from foster homes to knocking out his high school principal and stealing cars just like his mom. He got shot in the leg and when his dad took him to the hospital, the cops arrested the fifteen-year-old and sent him to the Catskills, specifically the Camp Cass Rehabilitation Center. He escaped within a few months and made it back to New York City where he went from nude modeling to being the star of Warhol's films. After roles in Lonesome Cowboys, Trash, Heat and Warhol's two monster films, Joe decided to stay in Europe where he made all sorts of movies in all the sorts of genres that I love. Yeah, there's the American The Gardener, as well as Serge Gainsbourg's Je t'aime moi non plus, Savage Three, Killer Nun, Madness, Le Marge with Sylvia Kristel and many more. He even shows up somehow in Theodore Rex. Yes, the same man whose bulge is on the front of the Rolling Stones' Sticky FIngers and the cover of The Smiths' first album was in a movie about dinosaur cops. Anyways, this is the movie that Joe, who never once gave it away, came to Italy to make with Paul Morrissey. Baron von Frankenstein (Udo Kier) has made his sister Katrin his wife, yet ignores her as he works to create the perfect human being, going through corpses to men and women to craft his Serbian ideal. You know, when he isn't literally having sex with the body parts of dead women while shouting, "To know death, Otto, you have to fuck life… in the gall bladder!" He wants Nicholas (Dallesandro) to be the body for his creature, but he escapes and makes his way to the castle, where he begins to satisfy the Baroness. Once she reveals the fact that she only cares about herself, she betrays him and in return is given what she really wants: The opportunity to have sex with the Baron's creation, who responds by loving her to death. Another even more graphic scene happens when lab assistant Otto literally screws the guts out of the female monster (Dalila Di Lazzaro, Phenomena) causing the angry Dr. Frankenstein to kill him. I kind of dig that the end of this film echoes both A Bay of Blood and Manson's quote about "These children that come at you with knives — they are your children" by having the Frankenstein children holding scalpels that they will either use to help or to hurt. The movie doesn't tell you what happens next. That A Bay of Blood comparison is easier to make when you realize that one of the kids is played by one of the adorable and murderous kids from that movie, Nicoletta Elmi. In the 70s, if you wanted a frightening Italian red-headed child, you went with Nicoletta, who also appeared in Baron Blood, Who Saw Her Die?, Deep Red and many more. She also played the red-head usher in Demons when she grew up. Despite his name being on this film, Andy Warhol's contributions were minimal. He may have visited the set once and looked at the editing for a brief moment. Perhaps a more involved talent was Antonio Margheriti — Anthony Dawson — who claimed to have directed some of the film. He may have just been there so that the film could claim to be Italian, as it would need a director from the country to obtain Italian nationality for the producers. Rated 3 out of 5 stars 02/06/23 Full Review Audience Member Pure vomit. The devil has many disguises. Rated 0.5 out of 5 stars 02/16/23 Full Review andrey k There's some delight in this gory and comic film, one of the many parodies on the famous story. Fans of trashy but elegant movies will certainly appreciate it. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 03/31/23 Full Review Audience Member This one of those movies that the critics tell us we should like, but in reality most of us came out saying meh. The above numbers don't lie. Rated 1.5 out of 5 stars 01/17/23 Full Review Read all reviews
      Andy Warhol's Frankenstein

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      Cast & Crew

      40% 43% And Now the Screaming Starts 35% 30% Eaten Alive 50% 61% J.D.'s Revenge 45% 36% The Oblong Box 74% 67% Phantasm TRAILER for Phantasm Discover more movies and TV shows. View More

      Movie Info

      Synopsis Baron Frankenstein (Udo Kier) dreams of restoring Serbia to glory, so he builds male and female monsters whose children will become the new master race. Determined that they be fruitful, he aims to equip the male body with the brain of someone possessing a powerful libido. Thinking local stable boy Nicholas (Joe Dallesandro) will be perfect, he mistakenly gets the head of Nicholas' pious friend (Srdjan Zelenovic) instead. Meanwhile, Nicholas seduces the baron's wife (Monique van Vooren).
      Director
      Paul Morrissey, Anthony M. Dawson
      Producer
      Andrew Braunsberg
      Screenwriter
      Paul Morrissey
      Rating
      R
      Genre
      Horror
      Original Language
      English
      Release Date (DVD)
      Sep 27, 2005
      Runtime
      1h 34m
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