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      Released Mar 18, 2004 1h 19m Drama List
      69% Tomatometer 58 Reviews 72% Audience Score 2,500+ Ratings In this three-part experimental film, director Jean-Luc Godard explores violence, media and morality. In the first segment, "Hell," actual battle footage from various world conflicts is intercut with scenes from war films. Next, in "Purgatory," journalists Judith (Sarah Adler) and Olga (Nade Dieu) travel to Sarajevo for a lecture featuring renowned poets, writers and Godard himself. In "Heaven," the final piece, Olga strolls by an isolated lake inexplicably occupied by the U.S. military. Read More Read Less
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      Critics Consensus

      A dense, but thoughtful meditation about war by Jean-Luc Godard.

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      Critics Reviews

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      David Parkinson Empire Magazine The 73 year-old enfant terrible can still take society to task for failing to recognise that it's our dualities that enrich life rather than any fanciful notions of global unity. Rated: 3/5 Apr 1, 2006 Full Review Keith Phipps AV Club Jean-Luc Godard's unfathomable influence on filmmaking has allowed him to enjoy a kind of grandfather clause in recent years. Sep 26, 2005 Full Review Tom Dawson BBC.com Director Jean-Luc Godard, the enfant terrible of the French New Wave, is now in his mid-seventies, yet he's lost none of his desire to challenge an audience. Rated: 4/5 May 21, 2005 Full Review David Walsh World Socialist Web Site The filmmaker walks around gloomily, pontificating on art, society and filmmaking. ... I find a comment in my notebook "Insufferable, I wish I could leave." Feb 15, 2021 Full Review Tony McKibbin The List Godard carefully refuses to allow a story to develop... Godard instead offers a film in flux, so the viewer can enter into it on his or her own terms. Rated: 4/5 Apr 24, 2019 Full Review Kelly Vance East Bay Express Godard's montage is as deadly as ever and his palette is seemingly every camera shot that has ever been made. May 5, 2010 Full Review Read all reviews

      Audience Reviews

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      Audience Member good combo doc/drama Rated 2.5 out of 5 stars 01/21/23 Full Review Audience Member Has some important things to say. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 02/26/23 Full Review Audience Member Godard's semi documentary has many interesting elements but it's inability to come up with a cohesive whole ultimately leaves the viewer wanting. Rated 3 out of 5 stars 02/07/23 Full Review Audience Member Godards, Notre Musique explores the Israel and Palestine conflict using Dante's Divine comedy to do so. Like Divine Comedy we go through three stages (Hell,Purgatory, and Heaven). In Hell Godard shows us five minutes worth of violence, mainly decapitation. In that opening scene there was no more then fifteen words of dialogue. The Purgatory chapter on the other hand was filled with dialogue. Don't come in here expecting anything entertaining, it's strictly art house, and offers nothing to keep you watching. But Godard wanted to give a message using late medieval/ early renaissance literature Rated 3 out of 5 stars 01/12/23 Full Review Audience Member Difficult to fathom, much like many of Godard's later films. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 02/27/23 Full Review Audience Member I remember reading somewhere, where it said something similar to: That Jean-Luc Godard's films have more ideas in one frame than what most have in a single film. Godard's "Notre Musique" deserves that recognition. I watched this film last night, then read about it, and then watched it again. The film has three segments that are titled "Realm 1: Hell", "Realm 2: Purgatory", and "Realm 3: Paradise". From what I read, the structure is inspired by Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy, which I almost know nothing about. Since, I am unable to interpret in depth; I would like to mention one sequence where in a classroom of children, a translator is telling about the Mostar Bridge to the main character. Right after that, there is a simple, yet extraordinary panning shot of the bridge itself, showing exactly what the translator was saying without any words! In the Purgatory segment, there is a conference sequence in which Godard himself gives a lecture on text and image. I would like to share one quote from it. "In 1938...Heisenberg and Bohr were walking through Denmark's countryside. They pass by the castle of Elsinore. The German savant says, 'That castle has nothing extraordinary about it.' The Danish physic replies, 'Yes, but...if you say, Hamlet's castle, then it becomes extraordinary.'" This film may seem impenetrable, but I believe there is a door open that you can pass through. Godard from an interview with Michael Witt, talking about "Notre Musique": Michael Witt: When you are asked during the lecture whether lightweight digital cameras are going to save cinema you don't respond. Jean-Luc Godard: I wanted to keep the scene short. But in any case I know nothing about it. What's bad is that students think that because they've got a little camera, they can film something. The manufacturers, even the critics, say: 'It's great! Everyone can make cinema!' No, not everyone can make cinema. Everyone can think they're making cinema, or say, 'I make cinema.' But if you give someone a pencil it doesn't mean they're going to draw like Raphael or Rembrandt. If I'd said all that, however, it would have been too long for the scene. Lastly, I just want to say that you have to see the Paradise segment to believe it! Godard's paradise really shook me, I won't mention any details. This is really one of Godard's greatest films, I really loved it, and yes it does have a story even if people may not think it does. I did understand this film somewhat; I know I did not really explain it well, because I don't have the words. But this is one film I think everyone should watch. Definitely would like to hear people's insight! Rated 4 out of 5 stars 02/02/23 Full Review Read all reviews
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      Movie Info

      Synopsis In this three-part experimental film, director Jean-Luc Godard explores violence, media and morality. In the first segment, "Hell," actual battle footage from various world conflicts is intercut with scenes from war films. Next, in "Purgatory," journalists Judith (Sarah Adler) and Olga (Nade Dieu) travel to Sarajevo for a lecture featuring renowned poets, writers and Godard himself. In "Heaven," the final piece, Olga strolls by an isolated lake inexplicably occupied by the U.S. military.
      Director
      Jean-Luc Godard, Julien Hirsch
      Producer
      Alain Sarde, Ruth Waldburger
      Distributor
      Wellspring Cinema
      Production Co
      Les Films Alain Sarde, Avventura Films, France 3 Cinéma
      Genre
      Drama
      Original Language
      French (France)
      Release Date (Theaters)
      Mar 18, 2004, Original
      Release Date (DVD)
      May 17, 2005
      Box Office (Gross USA)
      $139.9K
      Runtime
      1h 19m