Rotten Tomatoes

Movies / TV

    Celebrity

      No Results Found

      View All
      Movies Tv shows Shop News Showtimes

      The Trojan Women

      PG Released Sep 27, 1971 1h 45m Drama List
      Reviews 52% Audience Score 500+ Ratings In the aftermath of the Trojan Wars, Queen Hecuba (Katharine Hepburn) takes stock of the defeated kingdom. Her son has been killed, and his widow, Andromache (Vanessa Redgrave), is left to raise their son, Astyanax (Alberto Sanz), alone. Hecuba's daughter, Cassandra (Geneviève Bujold), fears being enslaved by her Greek masters, while Helen of Troy (Irene Papas) risks being executed. Astyanax also becomes the focus of the Greeks' attention as the last male heir of the Trojan royal family. Read More Read Less

      Critics Reviews

      View All (2) Critics Reviews
      Roger Ebert Chicago Sun-Times We still have the elegantly random groupings of the chorus; we still have the close-ups of the faces haunted by tragedy; we still have the figures pinned down by a merciless sun... But Cacoyannis has returned only to the externals. Rated: 3/4 Oct 23, 2004 Full Review Emanuel Levy EmanuelLevy.Com Rated: 3/5 Jul 3, 2005 Full Review Read all reviews

      Audience Reviews

      View All (22) audience reviews
      Steve D Good cast, only ok story Rated 3 out of 5 stars 04/03/24 Full Review Audience Member Cacoyannis follows the same patterns as he did with Electra (1962) and The Trojan Women might not be as good as the previously mentioned film but the performances by Kathrine Hepburn and Vanessa Redgrave are still something you need to see. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 01/22/23 Full Review Audience Member Basically a televised play wrought with melodramatic acting. Unfortunately, quite boring. Rated 2.5 out of 5 stars 01/31/20 Full Review Audience Member The Trojan Women earns a sympathetic but low 3 star rating from me. This is the type of film I want to come off. This is the same director that did Iphigenia and Antigone and both came off very well as tragedies. Unfortunately, with Trojan Women the acting is very mixed. At times it is very good, but it is also often overwrought. I have to put this down to the directing and I suspect there may have been communication issues since Irene Papas comes off solid as Helen. Also, the sound is often very poor with the windy, open outdoor location and that may have caused the actresses to frequently shout their lines. Still, as a lover of Greek myth and drama, I find Trojan Women passable and admire the efforts made. Rated 3 out of 5 stars 01/15/23 Full Review Audience Member I saw The Trojan Woman on a disc from Netflix last night (October 24, 2014.) I don't think I would know how to watch it in 1971. But, my recent interest in Greek mythology eggs me on; and I'm glad I watched this well-made, cerebral movie. It can be mentally painful at times because it reminds us how pride, power and lust could lead to ineffable suffering. I was glad I did not push the stop button till the end. Rated 4 out of 5 stars 02/25/23 Full Review Audience Member I'm Watching this excellent work of Euripides shows us the senselessness of war Rated 5 out of 5 stars 02/24/23 Full Review Read all reviews
      The Trojan Women

      My Rating

      Read More Read Less POST RATING WRITE A REVIEW EDIT REVIEW

      Cast & Crew

      Movie Info

      Synopsis In the aftermath of the Trojan Wars, Queen Hecuba (Katharine Hepburn) takes stock of the defeated kingdom. Her son has been killed, and his widow, Andromache (Vanessa Redgrave), is left to raise their son, Astyanax (Alberto Sanz), alone. Hecuba's daughter, Cassandra (Geneviève Bujold), fears being enslaved by her Greek masters, while Helen of Troy (Irene Papas) risks being executed. Astyanax also becomes the focus of the Greeks' attention as the last male heir of the Trojan royal family.
      Director
      Mihalis Kakogiannis
      Producer
      Mihalis Kakogiannis
      Distributor
      Cinema Releasing Corporation
      Rating
      PG
      Genre
      Drama
      Original Language
      English
      Release Date (Theaters)
      Sep 27, 1971, Original
      Release Date (DVD)
      Mar 22, 2007
      Runtime
      1h 45m