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From the Earth to the Moon

1958 1h 40m Sci-Fi List
38% Tomatometer 8 Reviews 39% Audience Score 500+ Ratings
Following the Civil War, demolition expert Victor Barbicane (Joseph Cotten) develops the world's most powerful explosive, Power X. When other countries warn that the weaponization of Power X may be seen as an act of war, Barbicane and his rival, Stuyvesant Nicholl (George Sanders), join forces to create a Power X-fueled rocket to the moon. With Barbicane's assistant, Ben (Don Dubbins), and Nicholls' stowaway daughter, Virginia (Debra Paget), the two men set forth into outer space. Read More Read Less

Critics Reviews

View All (8) Critics Reviews
Clyde Gilmour Maclean's Magazine Clever special-effects camera work fails to atone for a confused story and several wooden performances... Dec 3, 2019 Full Review Thomas Delapa Boulder Weekly Rated: 3/5 Jul 29, 2005 Full Review Emanuel Levy EmanuelLevy.Com Rated: 2/5 Jul 3, 2005 Full Review Dennis Schwartz Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews Saddled with dull melodramatics, muddled intentions about weaponry uses, lame special effects (due to the low budget) and stiff acting. Rated: C+ Jun 15, 2005 Full Review Michael Szymanski International Press Academy Rated: 2/5 Jun 1, 2005 Full Review Steve Crum Kansas City Kansan Good treatment of Jules Verne. Rated: 3/5 Oct 16, 2004 Full Review Read all reviews

Audience Reviews

View All (24) audience reviews
Josh G A decent cast filled with cool special effects but drags down in making a simple story complicated. Once you hit the finale you get into space 50's sci-fi tones but getting there is tedious. Rated 2 out of 5 stars 07/26/23 Full Review dave s The first half of From the Earth to the Moon actually has some pretty decent production values and performances, especially from veterans Joseph Cotten and George Sanders as rival scientists feuding over high-tech explosives developed during the American Civil War. While it all gets a bit dull and muddled, at least it's passable entertainment. Things go downhill considerably over the second half when they embark on their unlikely space mission, accompanied by an assistant and the daughter of one of the scientists. The space ship is absurd (even by Civil War standards!!) and the plot becomes ludicrous, embarrassing to the point that you almost have to just look away and long for the competent boredom of the first half. Rated 1.5 out of 5 stars 03/30/23 Full Review martin a An outstanding classic, a very well made and ahead of its time film. I love the spaceship with a Victorian interior, just wonderful. The cast a great, and the acting is fantastic, a lost classic Rated 5 out of 5 stars 03/31/23 Full Review Audience Member Starts as a good movie on the same plane as Journey To The Center of the Earth. Unfortunately halfway through production RKO studios went bankrupt and Warner which picked up the option slashed the budget and the second half falls flat. Too bad, would have been interesting to see what could have been. Even so, great cast and acting. Rated 2.5 out of 5 stars 01/26/23 Full Review Audience Member In 1868, American inventor Victor Barbicane develops a powerful military explosive that he also uses as fuel for a moon-bound rocket manned by himself and a motley crew. Given the talent of the Hollywood stars such as icons Joseph Cotten, George Sanders and the source material From the Earth to the Moon novel by Jules Verne. I found the film to be substandard. I have decided to add some trivia about this film as it is more interesting than the movie its self. This went into production as RKO was preparing to shut down. It was believed to have had a much larger budget which was later cut. This greatly affected the quality of the special effects. Among the last-minute cost-cutting measures inflicted upon this film was the elimination of all scenes taking place on the moon. This was one of the last films produced for RKO. By the time it was completed, RKO had ceased production and distribution. It was released through Warner Brothers. Some of the music is actually the "electronic tonalities" created by Louis Barron and Bebe Barron for Forbidden Planet (1956). Although shot in academy 1.37:1 aspect ratio (for later television airing) the theatrical--or intended (by the studio, producer, director and/or cinematographer)--aspect ratio of this film is 1.85:1 widescreen. Most modern 16x9 (1.78:1) televisions have a "zoom to width" picture option, essentially allowing the viewer to see the film as the director and cinematographer originally planned. Rated 2.5 out of 5 stars 01/14/23 Full Review Audience Member A rare B sci-fi steampunk classic--helluva fun!! Rated 2.5 out of 5 stars 02/22/23 Full Review Read all reviews
From the Earth to the Moon

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Movie Info

Synopsis Following the Civil War, demolition expert Victor Barbicane (Joseph Cotten) develops the world's most powerful explosive, Power X. When other countries warn that the weaponization of Power X may be seen as an act of war, Barbicane and his rival, Stuyvesant Nicholl (George Sanders), join forces to create a Power X-fueled rocket to the moon. With Barbicane's assistant, Ben (Don Dubbins), and Nicholls' stowaway daughter, Virginia (Debra Paget), the two men set forth into outer space.
Director
Byron Haskin
Producer
Benedict Bogeaus
Screenwriter
Robert Blees, James Leicester
Production Co
Warner Brothers/Seven Arts
Genre
Sci-Fi
Original Language
English
Release Date (Streaming)
Nov 24, 2016
Runtime
1h 40m