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      The Landlord

      PG Released May 20, 1970 1 hr. 53 min. Comedy Drama List
      93% 14 Reviews Tomatometer 79% 500+ Ratings Audience Score As his 30th birthday nears, the aristocratic Elger Winthrop Enders (Beau Bridges) finally decides to leave his parents' home, and he purchases an apartment complex in the slums of New York. The coldhearted Elger plans to boot out the current residents and refashion the crumbling dwelling into a luxurious bachelor pad. But after the spoiled young man befriends locals Francine (Diana Sands) and Margie (Pearl Bailey), he abandons his plans and instead focuses on charming his lovely neighbors. Read More Read Less

      Audience Reviews

      View All (60) audience reviews
      Alec B Still provocative but it's the film's deep humanity and the empathy for the characters that really endures. Rated 4.5 out of 5 stars 02/28/24 Full Review Shioka O I first watched this in 2022, it was unexpectedly good. This is categorised as a comedy, but definitely more than that. Glueing script, and cinematography is too good. (I found this was by Gordon Willis) Recommend for someone looking for 70s feel. Rated 4.5 out of 5 stars 10/23/22 Full Review dave s Despite being a bit stylistically dated, Hal Ashby's first directorial effort about race relations in America is as timely today as it was fifty years ago. Elger Enders is a 29-year-old aristocrat who decides to move out of his parents' palatial mansion, buy a rundown tenement building in New York, evict the tenants, and convert it into one massive and swinging bachelor pad. The social commentary offered up in The Landlord foreshadowed what was to come from Ashby over the remainder of the 70s decade – an unequaled string of great satires that tore at the fabric of American society. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 03/30/23 Full Review Audience Member It almost had me...but that evil "Dr" character ruined it for me in the last few minutes. Rated 2 out of 5 stars 02/07/23 Full Review Audience Member Firmly rooted in the fashions, sounds, language, and styles of the moment in which it was produced, The Landlord breaks free from these nostalgic anchors by authentically handling the timeless themes of race, sexuality, and class with a humor and intelligence rarely seen in motion pictures. Individual scenes dripping with the same Woodstock-era aesthetic that relegate lesser films to period curios are infused with uncommon charm and depth by cinematographer Gordon Willis, screenwriter Bill Gunn, and director Hal Ashby. An essential piece of early 70s filmmaking. Rated 4 out of 5 stars 02/01/23 Full Review steve d Its story does little with it's admittedly worthy goals. Rated 2.5 out of 5 stars 03/30/23 Full Review Read all reviews Post a rating

      Cast & Crew

      Critics Reviews

      View All (14) Critics Reviews
      Pauline Kael New Yorker Hal Ashby's dbut film as a director is one of his best. Apr 7, 2016 Full Review Dave Kehr Chicago Reader Liberal guilt, with a few good laughs, a lot of frantic activity, and the occasional backfire. May 7, 2013 Full Review TIME Magazine A glossy, flat, fake Hollywood attempt at black social comedy. May 7, 2013 Full Review Kathy Fennessy Seattle Film Blog Though Harold and Maude would secure his reputation the following year--once it caught on, that is--Ashby's first film proves he was a natural. Rated: 3.5/4 Jul 18, 2022 Full Review Jas Keimig The Stranger (Seattle, WA) Anchored by Gunn's sharp, irreverent script, The Landlord does well because it focuses on the ridiculousness of wealthy white people. Dec 8, 2021 Full Review Emanuel Levy EmanuelLevy.Com Hal Ashby's feature directing debut is a poignant social satire about racial tensions in New York, extremely well acted by Beau Bridges and Lee Grant in an Oscar-nominated role. Rated: B+ Aug 7, 2010 Full Review Read all reviews

      Movie Info

      Synopsis As his 30th birthday nears, the aristocratic Elger Winthrop Enders (Beau Bridges) finally decides to leave his parents' home, and he purchases an apartment complex in the slums of New York. The coldhearted Elger plans to boot out the current residents and refashion the crumbling dwelling into a luxurious bachelor pad. But after the spoiled young man befriends locals Francine (Diana Sands) and Margie (Pearl Bailey), he abandons his plans and instead focuses on charming his lovely neighbors.
      Director
      Hal Ashby
      Screenwriter
      William Gunn
      Distributor
      United Artists
      Production Co
      Cartier Productions, Mirisch Corporation
      Rating
      PG
      Genre
      Comedy, Drama
      Original Language
      English
      Release Date (Theaters)
      May 20, 1970, Original
      Release Date (DVD)
      May 3, 2010