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      The Muse

      PG-13 Released Aug 27, 1999 1h 37m Comedy List
      53% Tomatometer 80 Reviews 34% Audience Score 5,000+ Ratings Screenwriter Steven Phillips (Albert Brooks) seemingly has it all, including an Academy Award for his latest script. But he's hit an artistic dry patch, so his writer friend Jack Warrick (Jeff Bridges) recommends the services of Sarah Little (Sharon Stone), a woman he swears is a veritable muse. Steven takes her on and is suddenly more inspired to create. Her services, however, come at a very steep price and Steven becomes suspicious about who Sarah really is and what she wants. Read More Read Less Watch on Fandango at Home Buy Now

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      The Muse

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      Critics Consensus

      Despite quirky and original writing, the subject matter feels too removed to produce laughs.

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      Critics Reviews

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      Hillel Italie Associated Press "The Muse'' is an intelligent, undemanding comedy. Jun 12, 2018 Full Review Nell Minow Common Sense Media Satire, Hollywood in-jokes won't appeal to kids. Rated: 3/5 Dec 28, 2010 Full Review Globe and Mail Rated: 2/4 Mar 22, 2002 Full Review Mitchell Beaupre Paste Magazine Charmingly posits questions of how much does one’s juice come from within, and how much from some external, perhaps even mystical force? Rated: 7/10 Mar 25, 2024 Full Review Chuck Klosterman Akron Beacon Journal This kind of subject is barely interesting; it's insular and reflexive, and sometimes it laughs at its own jokes. But when you populate the story with some of the most unlikable characters imaginable, it evolves into something that's simply repellent. Rated: 1.5/4 Oct 26, 2023 Full Review Betty Jo Tucker ReelTalk Movie Reviews Like the character he plays here, Albert Brooks needed someone or something to re-inspire him while working on this plodding comedy. Oct 30, 2009 Full Review Read all reviews

      Audience Reviews

      View All (144) audience reviews
      Lisa W The Muse was delightful. Funny, charming, innovative - I loved the characters and Hollywoods gentle mocking of itself. Sharon Stone shows a comedic side and holds the heart of the picture throughout. Rated 4 out of 5 stars 01/22/24 Full Review Audience Member Let me tell you something Albert, real muses do not get put up in ritzy hotels or have grandiose expensive requests, NO, they have comedians texting them at 2am going "Did you want to hitchhike to Canada and pay for my hotel bill?" and you reminding them, "You clown...that $100 I sent was because you had Cancer, not for you to keep your unsuccessful career alive!". But, maybe Sharon Stone-like muses are the only muses The Angels provide, and you have to write what you know. I love everything about you Albert Brooks except your timing, your timing has always bothered me. You are too tight with your jokes, they are too well constructed, and it's like a great jazz man who is always on top of the beat and hasn't learned to swing it. You always know the beats to play, but they are just too neat. Please get sloppy for me. I need a replacement for Woody Allen stat, but, I need to make sure the timing is right. Rated 3 out of 5 stars 02/17/23 Full Review steve d The script is slow and fails to bring about any laughs. Rated 2 out of 5 stars 03/30/23 Full Review Audience Member Ok...those who know me know that I like a little quirkiness every now and then. It's mostly in my music, but sometimes in my movies. I love Albert Brooks movies too. Broadcast News single handedly made me want to be an executive producer in TV news and sparked me to enter Radio/TV/Film in college. The night I am writing this spotlight happens to be THE night I actually watched The Muse. It was adorable, quirky, quite funny and just a relaxing movie to watch. Let me tell you all about it... The dialogue in Brooks' movies always comfort me, humor me and make me feel so down-to-Earth. I think, for the most part, people are insecure about a lot of things. And in the same vein as Woody Allen, Brooks does an excellent job of being the average Joe who cannot catch a break. Yes his characters can get annoying (they actually seem to annoy most of the women I know), but that is his forte. The key to Brooks is making a movie with intelligent, humorous dialogue and memorable characters who touch us in some way, if even to annoy us. The realism he brings to the screen always intrigues me. In The Muse, Brooks does what has been done in several movies, and that is present Hollywood making fun of Hollywood. They tried it in Bowfinger, with some success, Get Shorty, with MUCH success, and now The Muse. Now, I'm not a big Sharon Stone fan (acting that is), but she pulls off her character very well as the Muse. She is self-absorbed, whiny and demanding. Ok, maybe she did not need to do that much acting, but she looks great on the screen and is very believable as a beautiful inspiration to middle-aged men. Albert, for the second time that I know of, plays a Hollywood career man. He is a screenwriter who has "lost his edge." His movies have become stale and the studio he had signed a deal with drops him. Suddenly he is out of work and old news. The scene where he tries to meet with Steven Spielberg and is issued a "walk on" pass to the studio rather than a "drive on" pass indicated just how fast Hollywood can love ya, then spit ya out as used up food. Desperately searching for some sort of inspiration to bring him back his edge, he goes to visit his best friend Jack, played by Jeff Bridges. Jack has had recent success in Hollywood, including an Oscar, and attributes it to a Muse. It takes some convincing, but Brooks' desperation leads him to try anything. He soon begins doing whatever it takes to win the Muse's interest as a prospective "client." Without telling you the whole story, the meat of the movie centers around what the Muse does (or doesn't do) to help bring him inspiration. The situations, dialogue and unbelievable things that happen while trying to build back Brooks' edge have even the audience suckered in to the Muse's abilities. By the end of the movie (and I cannot give away too much), everyone in the movie and watching the movie are dumbfounded by the things that happen just by trying and how silly things we could do every day are chalked up to the inspiration or brilliance of others. It is such a cute movie, perfect for couples who just want a silly movie to watch. My wife and I loved it. The Muse has a couple of messages that are pretty straight-forward. First of all, Hollywood is a big joke. I honestly cannot believe how anyone can base their career in Hollywood. The only place worse is Washington DC. Also, It does not matter what you use to inspire you to do great things. However, the point is, YOU CAN DO GREAT THINGS! Everyone can. Everyone has a different way of bringing it to fruition, but we all have it in us. We just need to bring it out. In summary, I recommend seeing The Muse. Warning though...the ending is a bit cheesy. It's cute, but cheesy. It's also full of cameos by TONS of Hollywood favorites, including Jennifer Tilly, James Cameron, Martin Scorcese, Rob Reiner, Steven Wright and many more. When you are feeling like something fluffy, go rent it. Rated 4 out of 5 stars 01/16/23 Full Review Audience Member Ok...those who know me know that I like a little quirkiness every now and then. It's mostly in my music, but sometimes in my movies. I love Albert Brooks movies too. Broadcast News single handedly made me want to be an executive producer in TV news and sparked me to enter Radio/TV/Film in college. The night I am writing this spotlight happens to be THE night I actually watched The Muse. It was adorable, quirky, quite funny and just a relaxing movie to watch. Let me tell you all about it... The dialogue in Brooks' movies always comfort me, humor me and make me feel so down-to-Earth. I think, for the most part, people are insecure about a lot of things. And in the same vein as Woody Allen, Brooks does an excellent job of being the average Joe who cannot catch a break. Yes his characters can get annoying (they actually seem to annoy most of the women I know), but that is his forte. The key to Brooks is making a movie with intelligent, humorous dialogue and memorable characters who touch us in some way, if even to annoy us. The realism he brings to the screen always intrigues me. In The Muse, Brooks does what has been done in several movies, and that is present Hollywood making fun of Hollywood. They tried it in Bowfinger, with some success, Get Shorty, with MUCH success, and now The Muse. Now, I'm not a big Sharon Stone fan (acting that is), but she pulls off her character very well as the Muse. She is self-absorbed, whiny and demanding. Ok, maybe she did not need to do that much acting, but she looks great on the screen and is very believable as a beautiful inspiration to middle-aged men. Albert, for the second time that I know of, plays a Hollywood career man. He is a screenwriter who has "lost his edge." His movies have become stale and the studio he had signed a deal with drops him. Suddenly he is out of work and old news. The scene where he tries to meet with Steven Spielberg and is issued a "walk on" pass to the studio rather than a "drive on" pass indicated just how fast Hollywood can love ya, then spit ya out as used up food. Desperately searching for some sort of inspiration to bring him back his edge, he goes to visit his best friend Jack, played by Jeff Bridges. Jack has had recent success in Hollywood, including an Oscar, and attributes it to a Muse. It takes some convincing, but Brooks' desperation leads him to try anything. He soon begins doing whatever it takes to win the Muse's interest as a prospective "client." Without telling you the whole story, the meat of the movie centers around what the Muse does (or doesn't do) to help bring him inspiration. The situations, dialogue and unbelievable things that happen while trying to build back Brooks' edge have even the audience suckered in to the Muse's abilities. By the end of the movie (and I cannot give away too much), everyone in the movie and watching the movie are dumbfounded by the things that happen just by trying and how silly things we could do every day are chalked up to the inspiration or brilliance of others. It is such a cute movie, perfect for couples who just want a silly movie to watch. My wife and I loved it. The Muse has a couple of messages that are pretty straight-forward. First of all, Hollywood is a big joke. I honestly cannot believe how anyone can base their career in Hollywood. The only place worse is Washington DC. Also, It does not matter what you use to inspire you to do great things. However, the point is, YOU CAN DO GREAT THINGS! Everyone can. Everyone has a different way of bringing it to fruition, but we all have it in us. We just need to bring it out. In summary, I recommend seeing The Muse. Warning though...the ending is a bit cheesy. It's cute, but cheesy. It's also full of cameos by TONS of Hollywood favorites, including Jennifer Tilly, James Cameron, Martin Scorcese, Rob Reiner, Steven Wright and many more. When you are feeling like something fluffy, go rent it Rated 4 out of 5 stars 02/07/23 Full Review Audience Member A comedic romp about a woman (Stone) who seems to inspire Hollywood filmmakers, who are in creative slumps. The casting is perfect and Brooks' writing is biting. Rated 4 out of 5 stars 01/21/23 Full Review Read all reviews
      The Muse

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      Movie Info

      Synopsis Screenwriter Steven Phillips (Albert Brooks) seemingly has it all, including an Academy Award for his latest script. But he's hit an artistic dry patch, so his writer friend Jack Warrick (Jeff Bridges) recommends the services of Sarah Little (Sharon Stone), a woman he swears is a veritable muse. Steven takes her on and is suddenly more inspired to create. Her services, however, come at a very steep price and Steven becomes suspicious about who Sarah really is and what she wants.
      Director
      Albert Brooks
      Producer
      Herb Nanas
      Screenwriter
      Albert Brooks, Monica McGowan Johnson
      Distributor
      October Films, USA Films
      Production Co
      October Films
      Rating
      PG-13
      Genre
      Comedy
      Original Language
      English
      Release Date (Theaters)
      Aug 27, 1999, Original
      Release Date (Streaming)
      Feb 12, 2014
      Box Office (Gross USA)
      $11.6M
      Runtime
      1h 37m
      Sound Mix
      Surround
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