Rotten Tomatoes

Movies / TV

    Celebrity

      No Results Found

      View All
      Movies Tv shows Shop News Showtimes

      Our Sons

      TV-14 1991 1 hr. 36 min. Drama List
      Reviews 71% 500+ Ratings Audience Score Donald Barnes is stricken with AIDS and languishing in a San Diego hospital. His boyfriend, James Grant, tells his businesswoman mother, Audrey Grant, the tragic news and asks her to accompany him to Arkansas to find Donald's homophobic mother, waitress Luanne Barnes. As she struggles to convince Luanne to visit her dying son, Audrey faces her own repressed hostility toward her son's sexuality. Read More Read Less

      Audience Reviews

      View All (15) audience reviews
      Jeff M Although far from perfect, this TV movie from nearly 20 years ago actually holds up better than most and still feels quite frank in its depiction of fear, prejudice and acceptance. It's fun to see a young Hugh Grant, and his hair is quite a wonder to behold; but this is all about the two leading ladies, and while Andrews is the glue that holds the film together, it's Ann-Margret who stands out as she walks a very delicate tightrope, coming very close but never quite falling into stereotype. Some of her actions and attitudes may seem outrageous, but even by today's standards, they feel rooted in an unfortunate reality. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 02/04/24 Full Review Audience Member While this is a dated piece as of 1/2019, at the time it aired it was monuments in portraying two out gay men and the pain and anguish of families dealing with AIDS. Specifically choosing to focus on the abandonment of LGBTQ people by their families, a problem that we are seeing all too regularly, some 28 years later. I must admit that seeing it when it was broadcast was amazing. My entire family watched it together. What I took from that encounter was peace, as my family told me if that ever happened to me, abandonment was never going to be on the menu. Kudos to Julie Andrews and Ann-Margaret. Their forceful performance was a thing of beauty. Looking back on it now in 2019, it still haunts me to this day. Executive Peoducr Robert Greenwald (of OutFoxed, etc. game) took a big chance on this made for TV movie. It wasnï¿ 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2(TM)t in vain, he should be commended for his bravery. Sure, the cars and clothes are dated, but the message remains the same. Itï¿ 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2(TM)s one of reconciliation and love. And thatï¿ 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2(TM)s valuable no matter what century it it happens in. One last note to ABC Television, which was then owned by CapCities. They took a huge chance, dealt with the advertisers pulling out because of threats by the usual religious kooks, and decided to put out s product that was dealing with a topical issue at the time (still is, btw) and green-kit the project because the country needed to see that these people were human too, with human frailties, human fears, and human dignity. They placed two gay men (the actors, who werenï¿ 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2(TM)t gay, but thatï¿ 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2 1/2(TM)s another story...) on prime time network television and let the torpedoes be damned. That took serious stones. Thank you for doing the right thing. Rated 5 out of 5 stars 02/01/23 Full Review Audience Member ms Andrew's TV pic debut dealing with gay children Rated 3 out of 5 stars 01/21/23 Full Review Audience Member This movie has wonderful performances all around. It has a bitter-sweet storyline that brings tears. It's wonderfully put together and brought out. For a TV movie it's really well thought-out! Rated 3 out of 5 stars 01/22/23 Full Review Audience Member (from The Watermark 10/02/96) This film's big claim to fame is that it's Julie Andrews' first made-for-TV movie. She plays a successful California career woman whose son, played by Hugh Grant, tells her that his lover (Zeljko Ivanek) is dying of AIDS. Grant asks Andrews if she could personally contact Ivanek's mother (Ann-Margret) in Arkansas and bring her back to see her son one last time. But Margret, who disowned her son when he came out to her, doesn't want to see him. When she does finally agree, Margret and Andrews find that they are two women of completely different backgrounds and lifestyles, yet they are bound together by the homosexuality of their children. When Margret and Ivanek finally reconcile, Andrews and Grant realize that they, too, need to confront a few issues that are marring their own relationship. The film is directed with great sensitivity by John Erman who managed to turn out a full-bodied dramatic work without a gigantic budget. It doesn't focus on the issues of AIDS as much as it focuses on the interaction of the characters. Looking like Eileen Brennan in a Dolly Parton wig, Margret is very moving as an uneducated yet outspoken white-trashy waitress. Andrews gives the best performance in the film, casting aside her usual sugary sweetness to portray a composed and sometimes icy business woman. Grant is a real surprise: he does a flawless American accent. His performance is understated, and perfectly believable as a man coping with his lover's impending death. The videocassette version makes the small mistake of editing out the "fade to black" shots originally intended for the insertion of commercials. Some of the cutaways and transitions seem premature and clumsy as a result. As the dying lover, Ivanek gets very little screen time compared to the stars, and the film could have delved deeper into his character and how the disease had affected his life. Small shortcomings aside, grab a hankie, and enjoy an oddity for the 1990's: a well-made TV movie. Rated 4 out of 5 stars 02/19/23 Full Review Audience Member The story is basically about a young gay couple, one of whom is played by a young Hugh Grant, trying in vain to sound like an American, even though his mother is played by Julie Andrews. Grant's lover is dying of AIDS and wants to reconcile with his estranged mother (played by a slightly over-the-top Ann Margaret in a blond wig) before he dies. So Grant sends his mother (Andrews) to Arkansas to try and convince his lover's mother, who hasn't seen her son in years to come and see her son. Naturally, being an ignorant woman, she refuses. (There's a high camp moment when Andrews slaps Ann Margaret and calls her a stupid b****.) And so the bulk of the film is about her coming to terms with what she has tried to ignore for years and make peace with her son. Rated 5 out of 5 stars 02/19/23 Full Review Read all reviews Post a rating

      Cast & Crew

      Movie Info

      Synopsis Donald Barnes is stricken with AIDS and languishing in a San Diego hospital. His boyfriend, James Grant, tells his businesswoman mother, Audrey Grant, the tragic news and asks her to accompany him to Arkansas to find Donald's homophobic mother, waitress Luanne Barnes. As she struggles to convince Luanne to visit her dying son, Audrey faces her own repressed hostility toward her son's sexuality.
      Director
      John Erman
      Executive Producer
      Robert Greenwald, Carla Singer
      Screenwriter
      William Hanley, Micki Dickoff
      Production Co
      Robert Greenwald Productions
      Rating
      TV-14
      Genre
      Drama
      Original Language
      English
      Release Date (Streaming)
      Jul 9, 2018