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      Rosenstraße

      PG-13 Released Aug 10, 2003 2h 15m Drama War List
      56% Tomatometer 63 Reviews 67% Audience Score 1,000+ Ratings After the death of her father, Hannah (Maria Schrader) observes her widowed mother, Ruth (Jutta Lampe), partaking in Orthodox Jewish mourning rituals. Ruth refuses to answer Hannah's questions about why she's doing this, so Hannah goes to Germany to learn about her parents' past during World War II. She meets the elderly Lena (Doris Schade), who tells Hannah about Ruth's role in the Rosenstrasse protest of 1943, which aimed to free Jewish husbands from jail and prevent their deportation. Read More Read Less

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      Critics Consensus

      Thoughtful drama marred by structural problems.

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      Critics Reviews

      View All (63) Critics Reviews
      Marjorie Baumgarten Austin Chronicle Not uninteresting, and it is very nicely performed, although you'll strain to learn from the movie the history on which it is based and struggle futilely to get inside the motivations of its characters. Rated: 1.5/5 Dec 12, 2004 Full Review Roger Moore Orlando Sentinel The trite framework, static staging and unemotional acting render this a most forgettable Holocaust tale. Rated: 3/5 Dec 3, 2004 Full Review Connie Ogle Miami Herald Succeeds as a testament to the power of love and, in particular, as a tribute to brave women. Rated: 2.5/4 Oct 29, 2004 Full Review David Walsh World Socialist Web Site Rosenstrasse delivers a blow to the arguments of those who claim that the crimes of the Nazis expressed the will of the German people. Feb 15, 2021 Full Review Agnieszka Tennant Christianity Today In spite of some manipulation and improbability, Rosenstrasse made me feel good for a good, historical reason, and it didn't minimize anyone's suffering in the process. Rated: 3/4 Nov 1, 2006 Full Review Jeremy C. Fox Pajiba Lena became a foster mother to Ruth for several years, but for all the interest von Trotta puts into that story, Lena might as well have been asked to catsit. Sep 16, 2005 Full Review Read all reviews

      Audience Reviews

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      Frances H A touching story of a group of women who chose to stand by their Jewish husbands, so that most were released. Maybe, in the face of the Holocaust, this seems like a drop in the proverbial bucket, but as the film says, maybe it was just a few lives, "a small ray of light in the darkness," but when you are in deepest night, that one ray is all you have, and you hold on to the memory of it with all your might. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 10/17/14 Full Review Audience Member Based on a true story which happens in second world war. The story is very touching. A german woman fights to get her jewish husband back. The man has been capture in the Rosenstrasse. Rated 5 out of 5 stars 02/21/23 Full Review Audience Member Margarethe von Trotta's cinematic account of the Rosenstrasse protests of 1943 perhaps has too many threads to be tied up simply, but history and recollection can be a bit complicated. Katya Riemann stars as Lena von Eschenbach, the daughter of an aristocratic German (Aryan) family, who falls in love with and marries a talented Jewish musician, Fabian Fischer (Martin Feifel), who because of his "mixed marriage" to an Aryan woman has not been rounded up for deportation with the other Jews of the city, and instead is given a job in a munitions factory. But in the winter of 1943, he was detained with a few hundred other men and women in a Jewish center on Rose Street (Rosenstrasse) in Berlin. His wife, Lena, finds out where he is being held, and there she joins an increasing number of other wives and relatives whose loved ones are being held. They form a vigil group and stand watch in the cold, hoping to put moral pressure on the authorities for the release of their loved ones. It is at the Rosenstrasse protests that Lena meets and adopts a little Jewish girl, Ruth, whose mother is also being held. She takes Ruth into her home, and treats her as her own daughter. The story is framed by a modern day story of Ruth, now living in New York City, mourning her recently deceased American husband, while her own daughter Hannah (Maria Schrader) goes to Berlin to find Lena Fischer, now nearly ninety, and to learn from her the story of her mother's tragic past. The film moves very slowly and has a few too many subplots to be entirely successful, but there are moments of well-earned emotion, and the film is always tasteful and thoughtful. This is not a Holocaust movie, and it's scope is too microscopic to be particularly weighty compared to films like "Schindler's List," but still history is actually the sum of millions of smaller stories like this, and one thing "Rosenstrasse" does well is to make us mindful of the moral complexities that faced the German population during the Third Reich, ordinary people who were caught up in the larger sweep of world events. Some acted nobly, some less so, and "Rosenstrasse" does the service of putting faces, and personal details, to a few of those stories. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 02/02/23 Full Review Audience Member Longish and rather intricate, It tried to be a serious Holocaust film but was in reality considerably lighter than other productions. That having been said, the cast did a fine job. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 02/13/23 Full Review Audience Member A great movie about the Holocaust. I was really impress with Maria Schraders and Katja Riemmans acting. The women asking for their husbands in Rosenstrasse is a reminder of the Mothers of Plaza de Mayo. Great story. Rated 4 out of 5 stars 02/06/23 Full Review Audience Member Well produced, if a slightly contrived narrative. based on an event which has been interpreted in various ways - there seems to be no clear historic basis for claiming this as an example of successful nonviolent protest. See opposing tales on Wikipedia and the Facebook page. http://www.facebook.com/topic.php?uid=13032654881&topic=10884 and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosenstrasse_protest . Enjoyed the drama though - I was drawn in and upset in equal measure, as always with movies about the Holocaust. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 02/14/23 Full Review Read all reviews Post a rating

      Cast & Crew

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      Movie Info

      Synopsis After the death of her father, Hannah (Maria Schrader) observes her widowed mother, Ruth (Jutta Lampe), partaking in Orthodox Jewish mourning rituals. Ruth refuses to answer Hannah's questions about why she's doing this, so Hannah goes to Germany to learn about her parents' past during World War II. She meets the elderly Lena (Doris Schade), who tells Hannah about Ruth's role in the Rosenstrasse protest of 1943, which aimed to free Jewish husbands from jail and prevent their deportation.
      Director
      Margarethe von Trotta
      Screenwriter
      Margarethe von Trotta, Pamela Katz
      Distributor
      IDP Distribution
      Production Co
      Get Reel Productions
      Rating
      PG-13
      Genre
      Drama, War
      Original Language
      German
      Release Date (Theaters)
      Aug 10, 2003, Original
      Release Date (Streaming)
      May 4, 2017
      Box Office (Gross USA)
      $732.0K
      Runtime
      2h 15m
      Sound Mix
      Surround
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