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The Kautokeino Rebellion

2008 1h 40m Drama List
Reviews 81% Audience Score 1,000+ Ratings A religious reawakening inspires rebellion in a 19th century Norwegian village. Read More Read Less

Audience Reviews

View All (149) audience reviews
Audience Member here you can see how much pain suffering church brought to people, nothing good come out of it,,, pure evill,,,,, Rated 4 out of 5 stars 02/07/23 Full Review Audience Member I literally slept for a few minutes during the first part of this film. I also found it odd so it was a surprise to me when I discovered that it was a true story. Still, it was nice to know a little about Norway. Rated 2 out of 5 stars 01/21/23 Full Review Audience Member In 1852, Sami reindeer herders in the Arctic region of Norway were fed up with the Norwegian liquor industry exploiting their tendency to alcoholism, local government officials seizing parts of their herds, and a corrupt state church ignoring it all. They rioted, beating the local priest and killing a merchant and government official. The two men considered ringleaders, Aslak Haetta and Mons Somby, were tried and executed. This incidence is little-known in most of Europe, but in the history of the Sami people it is one of the few tales of resistence to pressure from their southern neighbors and has gained a sort of epic status. Nils Gaups' 2008 film KAUTOKEINO-OPPRORET (The Kautokeino Uprising) depicts this event. The main character of the film is Ellen Aslaksdatter Skum, who with her husband Mathis Haetta, was sentenced to long imprisonment. Ellen is played by Anni-Kristiina Juuso, a Sami actress best known for her role in Aleksandr Rogozhkin's 2001 film KUKUSHKA. The film is multilingual, with the Sami speaking their own language, Swedish used as a lingua franca, and Norwegian heard from a few outsiders. Mid-19th century Norway is depicted in absorbing detail, and watching the film I felt to some degree that I was sharing the challenges of the characters in the frozen north. The film takes a few liberties with history (the whipping of the priest isn't portrayed, and the rioters are stopped by what seem to be Norwegians instead of their own other Sami neighbors. Still, it's generally factual and really inspires the viewer to go out and learn more about the event. What I really admire about the film is that it doesn't try to portray the murderers as bold defenders of national consciousness: their uprising was something of an act of blind rage and they were betraying their own Christian ideals. Other depictions of the riots, such as Launis' godawful opera "Aslak Hetta", give in to hyperbolic National Romantic feelings, but Gaups' film keeps it on the level. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 02/08/23 Full Review Audience Member The story is really in black and white with evil swedes and honest sami people minding their own funky buisiness. But it's beautifully filmed in nothern Norway, with the sun, the snow, the deer and the inhabitans of this remote land. The story of the sami people isn't that often told, and this is based upon true stories, sad stories of misstreating hard working scandinavian cowboys sort of. Peter Andersson plays a bastard as always and there are a lot of good performances all around. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 02/25/23 Full Review Audience Member I had to watch it in history class at school. I barely managed to stay awake. It was boring. At least by watching this movie I've learned a little something about social standings at that time. Rated 2 out of 5 stars 01/21/23 Full Review Audience Member In 1852, Sami reindeer herders in the Arctic region of Norway were fed up with the Norwegian liquor industry exploiting their tendency to alcoholism, local government officials seizing parts of their herds, and a corrupt state church ignoring it all. They rioted, beating the local priest and killing a merchant and government official. The two men considered ringleaders, Aslak Haetta and Mons Somby, were tried and executed. This incidence is little-known in most of Europe, but in the history of the Sami people it is one of the few tales of resistence to pressure from their southern neighbors and has gained a sort of epic status. Nils Gaups' 2008 film KAUTOKEINO-OPPRORET (The Kautokeino Uprising) depicts this event. The main character of the film is Ellen Aslaksdatter Skum, who with her husband Mathis Haetta, was sentenced to long imprisonment. Ellen is played by Anni-Kristiina Juuso, a Sami actress best known for her role in Aleksandr Rogozhkin's 2001 film KUKUSHKA. The film is multilingual, with the Sami speaking their own language, Swedish used as a lingua franca, and Norwegian heard from a few outsiders. Mid-19th century Norway is depicted in absorbing detail, and watching the film I felt to some degree that I was sharing the challenges of the characters in the frozen north. The film takes a few liberties with history (the whipping of the priest isn't portrayed, and the rioters are stopped by what seem to be Norwegians instead of their own other Sami neighbors. Still, it's generally factual and really inspires the viewer to go out and learn more about the event. What I really admire about the film is that it doesn't try to portray the murderers as bold defenders of national consciousness: their uprising was something of an act of blind rage and they were betraying their own Christian ideals. Other depictions of the riots, such as Launis' godawful opera "Aslak Hetta", give in to hyperbolic National Romantic feelings, but Gaups' film keeps it on the level. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 02/08/23 Full Review Read all reviews
The Kautokeino Rebellion

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Cast & Crew

Movie Info

Synopsis A religious reawakening inspires rebellion in a 19th century Norwegian village.
Director
Nils Gaup
Producer
Erik Disch
Screenwriter
Nils Isak Eira, Nils Gaup, Reidar Jönsson, Pelone Wahl
Production Co
Filmlance International AB, Rubicon TV AS, Metronome Productions
Genre
Drama
Original Language
Danish
Runtime
1h 40m