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      Turning Red

      2022, Kids & family/Comedy, 1h 40m

      289 Reviews 5,000+ Ratings

      What to know

      Critics Consensus

      Heartwarming, humorous, beautifully animated, and culturally expansive, Turning Red extends Pixar's long list of family-friendly triumphs. Read critic reviews

      Audience Says

      The movie's message might make some parents uncomfortable, but Turning Red has all the emotion and visual appeal that Pixar fans expect. Read audience reviews

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      Watch Turning Red with a subscription on Disney+, or buy it on Prime Video, Apple TV, Fandango at Home.

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      Turning Red  Photos

      Turning Red (2022)

      Movie Info

      In "Turning Red", Mei Lee is a confident, dorky thirteen-year-old torn between staying her mother's dutiful daughter and the chaos of adolescence. And as if changes to her interests, relationships, and body weren't enough, whenever she gets too excited (which for a teenager is practically ALWAYS), she "poofs" into a giant red panda!

      • Rating: PG (Suggestive Content|Language|Thematic Material)

      • Genre: Kids & family, Comedy, Fantasy, Animation

      • Original Language: English

      • Director: Domee Shi

      • Producer: Lindsey Collins

      • Writer: Julia Cho, Domee Shi

      • Release Date (Theaters):  wide

      • Release Date (Streaming):

      • Box Office (Gross USA): $1.3M

      • Runtime:

      • Distributor: Disney/Pixar

      • Production Co: Walt Disney Pictures, Pixar Animation Studios

      • Sound Mix: Dolby Atmos

      • Aspect Ratio: Flat (1.85:1)

      • View the collection: Pixar

      Cast & Crew

      Rosalie Chiang
      Sandra Oh
      Ava Morse
      Hyein Park
      Orion Lee
      Lori Tan Chinn
      James Hong
      Sasha Roiz
      Jordan Fisher
      Finneas
      Domee Shi
      Julia Cho
      Domee Shi
      Dan Scanlon
      Pete Docter
      Mahyar Abousaeedi
      Jonathan Pytko
      Ludwig Göransson
      Rona Liu
      Laura Meyer
      Steve Bloom

      News & Interviews for Turning Red

      Critic Reviews for Turning Red

      Audience Reviews for Turning Red

      • Jul 02, 2022

        Not my favorite Pixar movie, and having never been a young teenage girl there was certainly a large amount I couldn't relate to in it. That said, I love that Pixar is telling stories for this demographic and for the painfully under-told area of mother/daughter stories. And as far as mother/daughter stories go, it's a good one! Do I know what it's like to be in a relationship like that? No, because I am not nor will I ever be either, but again, I like seeing that these stories can be told! But as an adult male, the themes of finding yourself and identity could still resonate with me in a strong way. Plus, that panda is just cute. The characters are all incredibly strong and distinct, and obviously the animation is gorgeous. If anything, I wish the movie was funnier. However, I acknowledge a lot of the jokes were not meant for me, so some people may find this movie hilarious whereas I did not. Still a solid movie though.

        michael m Super Reviewer
      • Mar 29, 2022

        Disney is simply the best out there in terms of animation, specifically Pixar films. Yes, many animated films have come out from other studios that deserve higher praise for sure, but the consistency of Disney/Pixar animation has always been unmatched. Turning Red is Pixar's latest release, once again going straight to Disney+ and it's once again another delightful film by the studio. I'll try to keep my bias of having lived in Toronto at one point and still living in the vicinity of it to the side, but seeing a major animation feature taking place there put a huge smile on my face. Here's why I believe Turning Red should not just be seen by its demographic but seen by all ages. Following Mei Lee (Rosalie Chiang) a 13-year-old girl on the brink of puberty, Turning Red is really about the exploration of what happens to your body, but in a much lighter and fun way. After turning 13, she begins to sense her body changing. As soon as she feels any kind of excitement, her body transforms into a giant red panda. Mei's insanely overprotective mother wishes for her to keep this a secret, as it's a family issue that has been dealt with before. This eventually leads to an emotional climax, but at its core, this is a film about Mei and her friends, just trying to live their lives. Where this film really sold me was the friendship between the four main young girls. It felt very authentic to how kids act and talk today. On top of that, making them the outsiders so that the entire school can think Mei is incredible when they finally see the Panda was a great touch. This type of story has been told before, but it's always refreshing to see it done well. This is also one of the more mature subjects that Pixar has tackled in a while, which was very nice to see. Overall, where the film leads is pretty much exactly what I expected and there weren't a tonne of surprises, but the main twist did get me. I also am a huge advocate for a major studio believing that one of their employees deserves a bigger shot. Domee Shi (who also co-wrote the screenplay) directed the short film Bao for Disney a few years ago and it was one of the better ones in years. On top of that, she has been around in and around the studio for many years, working as a storyboard artist on films like Inside Out and Toy Story 4. She has now made one of Pixar's catalogue films and I believe it more than deserves a spot on the list. Turning Red is very straightforward in terms of how everything plays out, but it's still great. It's now streaming on Disney+ and I recommend it.

        KJ P Super Reviewer
      • Mar 17, 2022

        It's great! The film critic in me always appreciates an animated coming-of-age modern fantasy even if they are formulaic to death and uninspired in story structure. The Asian-Canadian in me on the other hand is truly charmed and grateful of the representation! It really is the extreme attention to detail that makes this film stand out and own it's narrative. Scenes are so carefully constructed with cultural references not only with Chinese and Canadian identifiers but of the early 2000's. The main character knows who she is, is an over-achiever and a young woman who isn't conventionally attractive; all arguably refreshing for the genre. Pixar's masterful animation with spot on keyframes and character expressions isn't anything to shrug off either (but who expects anything less in that regard) Turning Red really is a testament that there's still interesting ways to tell tired stories even if it is just changing details.

        Super Reviewer
      • Mar 16, 2022

        It's fair to start to wonder whether Disney has some kind of grudge against Pixar at this time. The last three Pixar movies have been pulled from theatrical release and made exclusively available as part of their streaming war chest with Disney Plus. You can blame COVID for Soul being pulled, and the theatrical market was still recovering by the time Luca was scheduled to be released during the middle of summer 2021, but this didn't stop Disney from releasing both of its own in-house animated efforts to theaters. Both Raya and the Last Dragon and Encanto played in theaters in 2021 and both under-performed at the box-office, which is clearly not close to where it was pre-pandemic. No animated movie has earned over $100 million at the U.S. box-office since COVID, and maybe that's the reason that Turning Red has become the third Pixar movie to go directly to streaming. There are rumors that this trend has been demoralizing for Pixar employees, and explanations by Disney brass that these movies move valuable subscribers to their service, but I guess we'll see when the Buzz Lightyear movie comes out summer 2022. Regardless, Turning Red is a high quality movie that made me feel warm and fuzzy all over. Meilin Lee (voiced by Rosalie Chiang) is a 12-year-old student trying to live her best life in Toronto circa 2002. That means she's one way with her friends and one way with her domineering mother, Ming (Sandra Oh). Mei is an overachieving student, devoted daughter to her family's business caring for a Chinese temple honoring their ancestors and red pandas, and a fangirl in the extreme for the popular boy band, 4-Town (even though there are five members). Mei's mother does not approve of her devotion to this band, or the influence of her friends, and doesn't understand the new person her daughter is turning into. However, Mei also happens to turn into a giant red panda whenever she feels any strong emotion. She has to keep herself in check, which is hard to do with mean students, an embarrassing mother, and the prospect of scrounging up enough money so she and her three besties can see their favorite boy band live. I had to consider what about Turning Red worked for me and what about Luca did not. They're both relatively smaller scale movies about characters who transform into fantastical creatures, who have to hide their secret, deal with parental disapproval, and come of age while pushing their personal boundaries and re-examining who they are and what they felt was important. There are several points of comparison but I found Luca to be broadly lackluster and low in stakes. With Turning Red, I found the movie to be much more engaging and poignant. So what's the difference where one feels shallow and the other feels personal and resonant? I think the difference is that Turning Red's relationships feel more realized and complex. The mother-daughter dynamic is fraught with tension, as trying to live up to the standards of the prior generation is often a surefire way to disappointment. That stuff is relatable, and the drama is potent, but the movie doesn't lose sight of the generational love underneath all the headaches. Both movies are in essence about growing up and finding your identity, relishing different parts of you that stand out as unique, and coming to terms with differences in perception, but I felt with Turning Red that the film embraced these themes, integrated them better, and also built a sturdier foundation of enriched character relationships. The animation is irrepressibly gorgeous but I really enjoyed the added style of Turning Red. It had a more tactile physical presence that reminded me of the Aardman models (Wallace and Gromit, Chicken Run). The color balance also emphasized bright colors that popped with subdued hues as a background. I especially enjoyed playful little touches from anime that emphasized the overly dramatic nature of the personal stakes, like when Mei is sweating over whether her mom will find her notebook filled with pictures of a crush that she felt compelled to draw. There's a definite energy to this movie that's missing from plenty of other Pixar movies. It follows the perspective of its heroine, so it's joyfully excitable and goofy at points and definitely over-the-top, like when she's calling out her besties and we flash to a rotating mountain they're all triumphantly scaling. It's adopted her perspective in a way that makes the movie feel more personable, and I appreciated Mei's character even more. Special credit should go to whoever was in charge of designing the fur textures for the red panda. When she fully panda's out, Mei resembles a wonderfully realized version of a Totoro-styled demigod. It was the third act where Turning Red went from amusing to surprisingly poignant for me. The central conflict is between Mei trying to be herself and the version her mother thinks she should be, which is naturally more deferential and devoted to the family at the expense of independence. This isn't the first story to explore the difference between traditional families and their children becoming more influenced by Western pop-culture. It's also not the first story about finding your voice and making a stand, or about parents coming to terms with the realization that their little kid isn't so little any more. That's fine. The supernatural elements are also pretty straightforward to follow and in service of the central relationships and metaphors. It's the personal details that make this movie feel specific to its voice while still being accessible and relatable. It's easy to cringe when Mei's mother shares Mei's private drawings with her fleeting crush. While many of us might not have been diehard fans of a boy band, we all had some phase where we felt more mature, more grown up, and dramatically different because of what this interest meant for us. I found myself battling genuine tears by the end. The end comes down to a conflict between mother and daughter, itself an echo of past conflicts, of overbearing generations being less flexible. It's also ultimately about acceptance, but the idea that the aspects about yourself that you feel embarrassed or insecure about do not need to be expunged from your identity I think is a worthwhile message about growing up. It's not about shedding parts of yourself, killing off things you dislike. It's more about transformation and acceptance of self. Turning Red is a briskly paced comedy with a precise, charismatic lead character letting us in on the pressures of her world and of being a teenage girl in the early twentieth century. It's colorful and frenetic at points but feels completely in keeping with the personality of our plucky protagonist. The combination of puberty and monster transformation has been a ripe area for films especially in the realm of horror. This also might be the horniest Pixar movie to date, and a climactic confrontation involves shaking one's butt, as they kids are wont to do in leisure. It's got the substance I felt was missing with Luca and the simplified and streamlined world building that I felt could have improved Soul. In short, Turning Red isn't top-tier Pixar but it's an irresistible urban fantasy that has plenty of heart and whimsy to enchant audiences no matter the age. Nate's Grade: B+

        nathan z Super Reviewer

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