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The Railroad Man

Released Jan 10, 1959 1h 58m Drama List
Reviews 69% Audience Score 1,000+ Ratings Andrea Marcocci (Pietro Germi) is a world-weary railroad engineer with several decades on the job. His wife (Luisa Della Noce) feels neglected, and his older son (Renato Speziali) and daughter (Sylva Koscina) have grudges against him. Only Andrea's young son, Sandro (Edoardo Nevola), remains devoted to his father. After Andrea almost causes a collision, his career takes a downturn, and the family crisis ramps up. Then a neighborhood Christmas celebration offers a chance at salvation. Read More Read Less

Critics Reviews

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John Armstrong Los Angeles Free Press A respectable melodrama, made with a good deal of feeling for its subject matter - the daily joys and sorrows of a large Italian working class family - and distinguished by a considerable, if by now well-worn, amount of artistic integrity. Feb 4, 2020 Full Review Read all reviews

Audience Reviews

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Audience Member The disintegration of a family....told semi Neo-Realistically--Trying times, shifting focus!! Rated 4 out of 5 stars 02/22/23 Full Review Audience Member Il Ferroviere is great example late Italian neorealisim. Edoardo Nevola is probably the best child actor I have ever seen. An amazing and unappreciated film from Pietro Germi. Rated 5 out of 5 stars 02/20/23 Full Review Audience Member [size=4][b]'Il Ferroviere' ('The Railroad Man')[/b][/size] [i]Pietro Germi, 1956[/i] [img]http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll279/JediMoonShyne7/1-102.jpg[/img] When we look at true film auteurs - those who exercise a full and almost obsessive level of creative control over their work - certain names crop up quite often; Orson Welles, Woody Allen, Jean-Luc Godard to name but a few. All of these can be seen to have conceived, written, produced, directed and starred in their own projects, and influential Genoa-born Italian auteur Pietro Germi is no different. Germi was born in the North but soon moved Southwards to find a career in the capital, working as an extra, bit-part actor, assistant director and eventually writer in order to support himself. During the sixties Germi attained worldwide fame for his work on satirical comedies, particularly '[b]Divorzio all'Italiana[/b]' ('[b]Divorce, Italian Style[/b]') for which he won an Academy Award. However, before this period Germi's focus was almost entirely upon social commentary and family drama with neorealist roots, aspects that can be seen strongly in his 1956 film '[b]Il Ferroviere[/b]' ('[b]The Railroad Man[/b]'). Here Germi provides the script, direction and a quite majestic performance as Andrea Marcocci - the family man around which this drama revolves. We open on a jolly Andrea and experience firsthand his love of wine and song, yet before the problems begin to mount up. His elder son is a shut-in with gambling problems and his elder daughter finds herself pregnant without yet escaping her teens. Indeed the only pure character left is Andrea's second son, the little Sandro, through whose eyes our tale unravels. Soon Andrea's problems culminate in the danger of losing his job after an accident leads to bosses questioning his position. Andrea is then seen working during a railway men's strike which leads to general ridicule from the community, ridicule that is directed both at him and his impressionable young son. [img]http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll279/JediMoonShyne7/4-66.jpg[/img] Yet another film that is narrated and viewed through the eyes of a child, '[b]Il Ferroviere[/b]' echoes the aforementioned and better known '[b]Ladri di Biciclette[/b]' ('[b]Bicycle Thieves[/b]') quite strongly. Each film has a similar standpoint, dwelling equally upon each Father's shame and each son's innocence. There is however a lot less neorealist influence here in this later film, influence that is still apparent but only as a lingering subtext. The main difference is that much like Germi's later '[b]Divorzio all'Italiana[/b]', '[b]Il Ferroviere[/b]' focuses upon the central marital relationship between Andrea and his wife Sara. While we see Andrea's inability to connect with his offspring, and his systematical way of driving them away, Sara remains loyal to him throughout even through the drinking and domestic violence. Ironically enough and as opposed to '[b]Divorzio[/b]' here Germi condones his main character's violence towards his wife. We are meant to feel sympathy for him, just as the child does, looking up to his Father as an idol. It is a tale of how one man's pride drives his family apart, and a tale quite symbolically driven forward through narration over the advancing form of a steam train. We see the seasons change and we witness thing break down for the Marcoccifamily. Pietro Germi bears a passing resemblance in both his appearance and his acting to the American Kirk Douglas, and much like Douglas he does well portraying such a proud and driven character. Germi's control over the film is somewhat meticulous and as such everything is concentrated and well organized, something the film benefits from greatly. He does allow the narrative to stray into melodramatic waters on occasion but can be forgiven for this largely thanks to the high calibre of performance he delivers. [b]7/10 [img]http://images.rottentomatoes.com/images/user/statusicon/forum_new.gif[/img] [/b] Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 02/05/23 Full Review Audience Member jenifergirlone4u@yahoo.com Hello. My Name is jenifer i want to your profile today at (www.flixster.com) and i love it i think we can clcik from thier!please i will like you to email me back through my email thus;(jenifergirlone4u@yahoo.com) am waiting to recive your lovely reply soonest! Yours jenifer! ( jenifergirlone4u at ya hoo dot com) please contact me through my email address so i can give you my picture and tell you my datel have a nice day Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 01/25/23 Full Review Audience Member With echoes of "The Bicycle Thief", this is a serious (but not devastating) film offering a look at the workman's Italy in the 1950's. Germi's undertaking the directing, writing, and leading role result in a tightly controlled, emotional experience. Of special note is the young boy Sandro who takes charge of the narration and guides your hand through his family history as much as he interconnects and guides the family in the creation of that history. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars 02/05/23 Full Review Read all reviews
The Railroad Man

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Cast & Crew

Movie Info

Synopsis Andrea Marcocci (Pietro Germi) is a world-weary railroad engineer with several decades on the job. His wife (Luisa Della Noce) feels neglected, and his older son (Renato Speziali) and daughter (Sylva Koscina) have grudges against him. Only Andrea's young son, Sandro (Edoardo Nevola), remains devoted to his father. After Andrea almost causes a collision, his career takes a downturn, and the family crisis ramps up. Then a neighborhood Christmas celebration offers a chance at salvation.
Director
Pietro Germi
Producer
Carlo Ponti
Screenwriter
Alfredo Giannetti, Pietro Germi, Alfredo Giannetti, Ennio De Concini, Carlo Musso, Luciano Vincenzoni
Production Co
De Laurentiis, Ponti
Genre
Drama
Original Language
Italian
Release Date (Theaters)
Jan 10, 1959, Original
Runtime
1h 58m
Sound Mix
Mono