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      Little Dorrit Part One: Nobody's Fault

      G 1988 2h 57m Drama List
      Reviews 83% Audience Score Fewer than 50 Ratings Part one of an ambitious six-hour adaptation of Charles Dickens' novel starts with the return of Arthur Clennam (Derek Jacobi) to London after for several years in China. A mysterious watch left to him by his dying father estranges him from his cold-hearted mother, but not before Arthur meets her enigmatic young seamstress, Amy Dorrit. Suspecting that his mother is the reason Amy is living in Marshalsea debtors' prison with her father (Alec Guinness), brother and sister, Arthur offers to help. Read More Read Less Watch on Prime Video Stream Now

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      Little Dorrit Part One: Nobody's Fault

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      Critics Reviews

      View All (1) Critics Reviews
      Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat Spirituality & Practice A scintillating screen version of Charles Dickens' 1857 novel about greed, power and love. Jul 19, 2003 Full Review Read all reviews

      Audience Reviews

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      steve d Ok version but it has been done better. Rated 3 out of 5 stars 03/30/23 Full Review keith w How disappointing that this masterpiece has so few reviews here. It proves you don't need a huge budget or special effects to tell a good story: just good writing and acting. One should also beware of the "fidelity syndrome". A film is not a book and vice versa. Ditching the villain Rigaud and turning the two part structure from poverty and riches into the story told from Arthur Clennam's and Little Dorrit's pov worked to the film's advantage, focussing on the key theme of the book: a love affair between two people whom society would reject if the full facts were known. Arthur Clennam was born out of wedlock and Amy Dorrit was born in the debtor's prison, the Marshalsea. Sarah Pickering was criticised by some for not being clearly spoken but I think this misses the point. She nailed the role in a way that Claire Foy didn't and couldn't. She was Amy Dorrit. There were some lovely touches in the film e.g. 1. About to leave the Marshalsea, Amy goes down the familiar staircase from her father's cell and leaps the last few steps, then goes back to repeat it one last time. 2.The jar of pickle dropping out of Amy's basket when she is told by her brother Tip is back in as a prisoner is another favourite moment. 3. Former sweetheart Flora Finching putting Arthur's hat lovingly on some cushions is another little gem of a moment. 4. The confrontation near the end between Max Wall as Flintwinch and Joan Greenwood as Mrs Clennam was two fine actors showing all their powers. 5. The moment when Amy runs along the Marshalsea yard to see Arthur in the same cell as her father occupied and the use of the flowers in the vase. 6. Amy instinctively tidying up her sister's bedroom while asking her about the bracelet. 7. Pancks telling Amy's fortune from her hand but actually describing what he knew of her life. 8. Young Amy and the dancing master and seamstress. This film deserves multiple viewing Rated 5 out of 5 stars 03/31/23 Full Review Read all reviews
      Little Dorrit Part One: Nobody's Fault

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      Synopsis Part one of an ambitious six-hour adaptation of Charles Dickens' novel starts with the return of Arthur Clennam (Derek Jacobi) to London after for several years in China. A mysterious watch left to him by his dying father estranges him from his cold-hearted mother, but not before Arthur meets her enigmatic young seamstress, Amy Dorrit. Suspecting that his mother is the reason Amy is living in Marshalsea debtors' prison with her father (Alec Guinness), brother and sister, Arthur offers to help.
      Director
      Christine Edzard
      Producer
      John Brabourne, Richard Goodwin
      Screenwriter
      Christine Edzard
      Production Co
      Sands Films
      Rating
      G
      Genre
      Drama
      Original Language
      English
      Release Date (Streaming)
      Dec 4, 2018
      Runtime
      2h 57m
      Sound Mix
      Surround
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